NRA Writes Congress: Don\’t Bother With Expanded Background Checks

by Categorized: Newtown, Washington Date:

The NRA fights back against the one area of possible common ground in Congress — expanded background checks for gun purchases. In a letter sent last week to senators, top NRA lobbyist Chris Cox says the existing National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) is good enough:

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2 thoughts on “NRA Writes Congress: Don\’t Bother With Expanded Background Checks

  1. bill

    The purpose of the Second Amendment is to arm people in order to prevent future tyranny. They need the tools to do this.

    The term “Well Regulated” in the Second Amendment meant “Well Manned and Equipped ” in 1791 as was determined in the 1939 United States v. Miller case after referencing the autobiography of Benjamin Franklin. The concept of Government Regulation, as we understand it today, did not exist at the time.

    United States v. Miller also determined that the term “Arms” refers to “Ordinary Military Weapons” (not crew operated). American Citizens have the right to Keep and Bear, which means Own and Carry, any weapons that a soldier carries into battle. That includes past, present and future weapons. A Militia consisted of armed volunteers willing to fight with their personal arms and not under government control.

    The 2008 Heller v. Washington DC decision reaffirmed that the Right to Bear Arms was an Individual right. The 2010 McDonald v. Chicago decision reaffirmed it yet again and made it clear that it applies to every state, every city and every town in the United States.

    To limit the Second Amendment to muskets would be the equivalent of limiting the First Amendment to the 18th century Printing Press.

    Liberty is worth the risk of death!

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