A better way?

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6 thoughts on “A better way?

  1. Richard

    Since Ayn Rand has come up so often I have a theory that a Central Planning Committee that issued 5-year plans wouldn’t be so bad.

    The commitee would made up of the 20 Richest US Citizens. Today it would be made up of retail superstars like The Waltons, The Koch Brothers, and the Mars Candy heirs (9 seats); the tech mavens from Microsoft, Google, Amazon and Oracle (7 seats); and a few financial superstars (Buffet, Soros, Bloomberg and Adelson).

    I doubt the country would be governed any worse or less equally than today. In fact I think we woud be a tech marvel using technology to drive down business expenses like healthcare, education, and energy.

    Then there’s the appearance of free will and democracy that keeps civil peace….

  2. Cynical Susan

    “The commitee would made up of the 20 Richest US Citizens. Today it would be made up of retail superstars like The Waltons, The Koch Brothers, and the Mars Candy heirs (9 seats); the tech mavens from Microsoft, Google, Amazon and Oracle (7 seats); and a few financial superstars (Buffet, Soros, Bloomberg and Adelson). ”

    And how would it differ from today? Oh. Right. No “voting.”

  3. peter brush

    When I lament the excesses of American democracy, I can take solace in the knowledge that the demos here is not quite as screwed up as that of Egypt (or any other Muslim country). Still, I’d really appreciate it if we could restore our skepticism about democracy and perhaps some of our non-hyper-democratic procedures.
    —————————————————
    An early method of choosing electors was selection by the state legislature. A majority of the states legislatively selected presidential electors in both 1792 and 1800, and half of the states did so in 1812.[56] One reason most U.S. history textbooks don’t start reporting the national aggregate popular vote until the election of 1824 is because more than a quarter of all the states used legislative choice in all prior elections; there simply was no popular vote for President in those states. Even in 1824, when Andrew Jackson lost in spite of having pluralities of both the popular and electoral votes, a full quarter of the states (6 of 24) did not hold popular elections for President and Vice President;[57] instead, those six state legislatures choose the electors that year. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electoral_College_(United_States)#Alternative_methods_of_choosing_electors

  4. Rick Moran

    Hundreds of thousands of New York and New Jersey residents are still without power, fuel, and running low on food. They are freezing as another storm bears down on them.

    So, of course, Obama will play his usal game of pick-up basketball:

    The president will observe his most time-honored Election Day ritual.

    Former White House spokesman Robert Gibbs, who has joined the campaign on its final day to travel with President Obama, said his former boss sent an e-mail to his former personal aide, Reggie Love, to start organizing his regular pickup basketball game in Chicago for Tuesday.

    Love is a former Duke University basketball player and regular hoops buddy of Obama’s, as is Chicago pal Martin Nesbitt, who has been traveling with Obama this week. The president will return to Chicago late Monday night to spend election day in his home town.

    “We made the mistake of not playing basketball once,” Gibbs said. “We won’t make that mistake again.”

    Obama didn’t play basketball on the day of the 2008 primary election in New Hampshire, which he lost to Hillary Clinton.

    It must be nice to know that no matter how badly you screw up, it won’t be reported anywhere that really matters.

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