Category Archives: CMS Schedule

The Week Ahead on the CMS

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MONDAY: Anxiety - “A person in the throes of monkey mind suffers from a consciousness whose constituent parts will not stop bouncing from skull-side to skull-side, which keep flipping and jumping and flinging feces at the walls and swinging from loose neurons like howlers from vines.” So writes Daniel Smith in Monkey Mind a tragicomic memoir about anxiety — both the emotion, which is universal, and the clinical condition, which is rampant. Also on the show, David Tolin, director of the Anxiety Disorders Center at the Institute of Living.

TUESDAY: The Process - Tune in for the second edition of “The Process,” our end-of-month show where we hear listener emails, update you on past show topics, and expose a few insights from behind the scenes of how the Colin McEnroe Show works.

WEDNESDAY: The Story of Stuff – How do we acquire (and get rid of) all of our stuff? One way is through the self-storage industry, which brought in $22 billion in revenues in 2011. We’ll take a look at America’s obsession with stuff, talk about one man’s ongoing storage wars and explore a UCLA study that planted “secret” cameras in the homes of 32 local families, in part to observe how they collected, stored and dumped their stuff.

THURSDAY: Bikes – Biking has gone from a casual sport to a multi-million dollar industry. People are taking up biking in record numbers, which is prompting demands for greater consideration from the drivers with whom they often share the road. We’ll talk to bikers, mayors, and more about what it means to establish a culture of safety between bikers and drivers on the road?

FRIDAY: The Nose - The Nose explores the week in pop culture with a roundtable of panelists. Special guest: Comedian Steve Hofstetter.

The Week Ahead

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MONDAY: Margaret McEnroe, the last of my father’s generation, has died, and I will give her eulogy on Monday. Perhaps a bit of Seamus Heaney will be in it:

If you know a bit
About the universe

It’s because you’ve taken it in
Like that,

Looked as hard as you look
Into yourself,

Into the rat hole,
Through the vetch and dock
That mantled it.

Because you’ve laid your cheek
Against the rush clump

And known soft stone to break
On the quarry floor.

Between heather and marigold,
Between spaghnum and buttercup
Between dandelion and broom,
Between forget-me-not and honeysuckle,

As between clear blue and cloud,
Between haystack and sunset sky,
Between oak tree and slated roof,

I had my existence, I was there.
Me in place and the place in me.

*

Where can it be found again,
An elsewhere world, beyond

Maps and atlases,
Where all is woven into

And of itself, like a nest
Of crosshatched grass blades?

*

So while I’m attending to that, we’ll revisit our show featuring our Superhero Repairers! Meet a team of appliance, television, and computer repair people who discuss when it’s worth it to fix your broken stuff and when you should just recycle it and buy a new one.

TUESDAY: Scaliamania. Wesleyan students camped out all night to get tickets to see The Supreme, who will visit (arguably) America’s most famously lefty college on Thursday. (There do appear to be Republican students.) While there, Nino will attend a performance of “The Bill of Rights,” an oratorio by composer Neely Bruce. We’ll have Bruce and a lawyer/singer and a Scalia scholar and a student. And maybe more.

WEDNESDAY: Is there any such thing as objective reality? A new book lays out an argument between a writer of “inventive” nonfiction and his fact-checker. And that triggers memories of the “reality-based community,” a phrase that dogged coverage of the Bush administration. So is truth a social construction or are there really such things as facts?
Hey: “This is this.”

 

THURSDAY: Drones? They’re not just for warfare anymore. Domestic drone use is expanding. It’s expected to soon eclipse the use of military drones.The ACLU is freaking out. So are we.

FRIDAY: The Nose chats about what happened this week locally and around the world.

The Week Ahead: Send Me a Picture of your Mixed Breed Dog

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We’re off today, sitting at home, thinking about Martin Van Buren. Also, we can’t believe Mary shot Matthew last night. Oop! Spoiler!
MONDAY: Special President’s Day programming. Mr. Dankosky’s Tree House. Alma the Badger and Big Gopher Ed are digging near the tree house when they unearth the Lost Skull of John Quincy Adams. The animals all argue about what to do with it. Many of the animals have never heard of eBay so Captain Hyena explains it to them. Mr. Dankosky tells them they have to give it to the Smithsonian and points out that one of their friends (Episode #38, “The Death of Sid the Condor.”) is already on display there. Musical guest: Peter Frampton.
TUESDAY: Our Westminster Mixed Breed Dog Show Begins. Guests include Show Dog author Josh Dean, the president of the Mixed Breed Dog Club of America and the founder of Dogs Against Romney. (Those are three different people.) Send us a picture and description of your mixed breed dog at Colin@wnpr.org.
WEDNESDAY: Are you jonesing for Mr. Bates already? Downton Abbey more than doubled PBS’s typical nightly audiences and brought the demographic way down out of the grey-haired set. How did it do that? Why can’t PBS just do that all the time? What else is there in the pipeline? Besides “The Incontinent Monkeys of Pesca Castle”?
THURSDAY: Why is irony so hard to define? Philosopher Jonathan Lear says irony isn’t only about humor or sarcasm. It’s about holding a mirror up to our society and causing real, social change. Was Abraham Lincoln America’s last great ironist? What about comedians like Jon Stewart and Steven Colbert? Lear talks about his new book A Case for Irony.
FRIDAY: Mike Reiss, award-winning writer for “The Simpsons” comes back to The Nose and gets ready to talk Oscars — he hated EVERYTHING — with Colin and Vivian Nabeta. Colin recently saw “War Horse” which was really great because he never has to see:”War Horse” again.