Category Archives: Data

Connecticut, Love It or Leave It? Actually, Neither.

by Categorized: Data Date:

There isn’t a house in Connecticut more than about an hour’s drive from a neighboring state. But in a recent Gallup poll, nearly half of us said we pine for those borders, saying we’d pack up the U-Haul and put Connecticut in the rear-view mirror, if only we could.

Connecticut was second only to Illinois in the percentage of state residents who answered “yes” to the question: “Regardless of whether you will move, if you had the opportunity, would you like to move to another state?” Fifty percent of Illinois residents wanted to run for the border, one percentage point higher than Connecticut.movingbox

But while statistically either you or the person next to you right now doesn’t want to be here, the percentage of us actually planning to disconnect the cable and wrap up the dishes is far lower, with 16 percent reporting they were “extremely,” “very” or “somewhat” likely to move in the next year. That was only slightly higher than the national average of 14 percent.

But don’t believe those figures either. Census data show that Americans don’t abandon their states in numbers anywhere near those levels. The most recent Census stats show that an estimated 2.3 percent of U.S. residents lived in a different state a year ago – and Connecticut’s numbers were at that very same percentage.

So the Gallup poll and the Census figures suggest that we grouse more than our fellow Americans, but don’t actually follow through on our disdain for the state.

Joining Connecticut in the Hate-My-State Club were Maryland, Nevada, Rhode Island, New Jersey, New York, Massachusetts and Louisiana. In each of those states, at least 40 percent of residents said they would like to swap out their license plates.

The happiest campers: Those in Montana, Hawaii, Maine, Oregon, New Hampshire, Texas, Colorado and Minnesota – where no more than a quarter of residents wish they were someplace else. Nationally, one in three survey respondents said they would move if they could.

Among those who long to get out of Connecticut, one in five cited work or business issues as the main reason – although that figure was still lower than in many other states. Cost of living, on the other hand, was cited far more often by Connecticut residents than those living elsewhere.

The map below shows the Gallup poll figures for each state. Residents of bluer states were the happiest staying put; states that hue orange were populated with those most eager to leave. Click on the map to find the numbers for each state. A data caveat: Gallup says the figures have a margin of error of +/- 5 percentage points.

The OTHER 1-Percenters in Connecticut Politics

by Categorized: Data, Politics Date:

The Whigs have been wiped out in Connecticut.

The Fascist Party has vanished, too. And there is no longer a single Connecticut voter registered with the Marijuana Party.

But across the state, dozens of minor parties endure, with dedicated members offering a serious alternative to the status quo – or just proudly occupying the fringe.

More than 99 percent of the state’s voters are registered as Democrats or Republicans or are formally unaffiliated. But that still leaves thousands of residents who are voting to the beat of a different drum, from the 2,061 Libertarians to the one remaining member of the Guilty Party.

Some of the minor parties are well known, including the Green Party and the Working Families Party (although “Independent” is the most frequently listed minor party designation). But many others are local and fairly obscure, from the three-person Enfield Taxpayers Party to the nine members of Hamden’s Spring Glen Party.

Overall, there are 30 minor parties represented in the state’s voter rolls, with names like “A Better Future” and “Independence for Montville” and “Simsbury Citizens First.” Eight of the parties have just one registered member.

Many more once-active parties have disappeared altogether. The Unity Party has fallen apart, and members apparently lost faith with the now-defunct Evangelical Party. And there are no more members of the Marxist Party, the Nice Party or the Grassroots Party.

And sorry, Star Wars fans: The Jedi Party has also ridden off into the suns-set.

Minor parties exist in every one of Connecticut’s 169 cities and towns. Click the map below to see the number of minor parties – and the number of minor-party members – in each municipality. (Darker colors indicate a greater number of distinct minor parties.)

UConn vs. Notre Dame: Point-by-Point, Minute-by-Minute

by Categorized: Data, Sports, UConn, Uncategorized Date:

Notre Dame led UConn for just 21 of the 2,400 seconds of Tuesday’s NCAA national championship game. The other 99 percent of the game: No contest. Relive the match with these interactive graphics.

The first graphic below is a minute-by-minute chart of the game. Move your mouse over the chart to see the play-by-play progress. Below that is a graphic showing the point spread in UConn’s favor over the 40 minutes of play. The last graphic shows points scored by every player. Use the slider or the arrows to advance through the minutes of the game, to see how the teams and the individual players performed.



UConn vs. Kentucky: Point-by-Point, Minute-by-Minute

by Categorized: Data, Sports, UConn Date:

UConn never trailed during Monday’s win in the NCAA national championship game against Kentucky. But that doesn’t mean it wasn’t a close game. Relive the victory with these data visualizations.

The first graphic below is a minute-by-minute chart of the game. Move your mouse over the chart to see the play-by-play progress. Below that is a graphic showing the point spread in UConn’s favor over the 40 minutes of play. The last graphic shows points scored by every player. Use the slider or the arrows to advance through the minutes of the game, to see how the teams and the individual players performed.



UConn vs. Stanford: Point-by-Point, Minute-by-Minute

by Categorized: Data, Sports, UConn Date:

Trailing by six in the first half of their semi-final game against Stanford, the Huskies finally found their groove, scoring 12 unanswered points and dominating the rest of the game. UConn will battle Notre Dame Tuesday for the national championship.
The first graphic below is a minute-by-minute chart of the UConn-Stanford game. Move your mouse over the chart to see the play-by-play progress. Below that is a graphic showing points scored by every player. Use the slider or the arrows to advance through the minutes of the game, to see how the teams and the individual players performed.


UConn vs. Florida: Point-by-Point, Minute-by-Minute

by Categorized: Data, Sports, UConn Date:

After a shockingly slow start by the Huskies – including a nearly six-minute dry spell – UConn roared back with a 27-6 run and never looked back. Next stop: The national championship game.

The first graphic below is a minute-by-minute chart of the game. Move your mouse over the chart to see the play-by-play progress. Below that is a graphic showing points scored by every player. Use the slider or the arrows to advance through the minutes of the game, to see how the teams and the individual players performed.

UConn vs. Texas A&M: Point-by-Point, Minute-by-Minute

by Categorized: Data, Sports, UConn Date:

After a rocky start, the UConn women roared ahead of Texas A&M to secure yet another familiar spot in the Final Four. A key turning point: a nearly five-minute Texas drought near the end of the first half, during which the Huskies scored 10 unanswered points. And it wouldn’t be UConn’s only 10-point run.

The first graphic below is a minute-by-minute chart of the game. Move your mouse over the chart to see the play-by-play progress. Below that is a graphic showing points scored by every player. Use the slider or the arrows to advance through the minutes of the game, to see how the teams and the individual players performed.

 

 

UConn-Michigan State: Point-by-Point, Minute-by-Minute

by Categorized: Data, Sports, UConn Date:

The UConn men defeated Michigan State Sunday and are headed for the Final Four after a powerhouse second half led by Shabazz Napier, who scored 12 points in 8 1/2 minutes. Relive the game with these interactive graphics.

The first graphic below is a minute-by-minute chart of the game. Move your mouse over the chart to see the play-by-play progress. Below that is a graphic showing points scored by every player. Use the slider or the arrows to advance through the minutes of the game, to see how the teams and the individual players performed.

UConn-Iowa State: Point-by-Point, Minute-by-Minute

by Categorized: Data, Sports, UConn Date:

The UConn men trailed Iowa State for barely more than half a minute in Friday’s Sweet Sixteen game at Madison Square Garden. But it felt like a much closer game in the final minutes before Connecticut’s 81-76 victory.

The first graphic below is a minute-by-minute chart of the game. Move your mouse over the chart to see the play-by-play progress. Below that is a graphic showing points scored by every player. Use the slider or the arrows to advance through the minutes of the game, to see how the teams and the individual players performed.
 

Connecticut’s $10.10 Minimum Wage: Adjusted For Inflation, We’ve Been Here Five Times Before

by Categorized: Data, Employment, Finance, Government, Poverty Date:

Connecticut is making national news with legislation boosting the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour beginning in 2017. With Gov. Dannel P. Malloy’s planned signature on the bill Thursday evening, the Nutmeg State becomes the first in the nation to agree to eventually knock through the $10 mark for the lowest-paid workers.

But adjusted for inflation, we’ve topped $10.10 before – albeit not for several decades. As the chart below shows, the hourly minimum wage, in 2014 dollars, exceeded $10.10 in 1968, 1969, 1971, 1972 and 1978. The top rate was in 1968, when the inflation-adjusted minimum was $10.78.

The $10.10 wage is, however, significantly higher than the average inflation-adjusted minimum wage over the last 63 years. Since 1951, the lowest-paid workers have earned an average of $8.39 in today’s dollars.

So $10.10 isn’t the most Connecticut employers have been required to pay, and it certainly isn’t the least. And that alone will assure the topic remains controversial and politically divisive.

CT_Minimum Wage