‘Conspiracy Nuts’ Relish Sandy Hook Secrecy Bill

by Categorized: First Amendment, Law Enforcement, Legal Affairs, Media, Politics, Public Safety, Transparency/FOI Date:

It surely wasn’t their intention – and it’s clear they really don’t care what those on the fringe think – but a new bill developed by top state officials that would shield parts of the Sandy Hook investigation is proving to be a big hit with conspiracy theorists.

“The conspiracy nuts are going to love this,” a colleague had predicted the night details of the bill surfaced.

He was right. The legislation – drafted in secret and promoting secrecy – has unintentionally tickled the minds of those who feel buoyed by believing they’re in the know about some spectacularly massive government cover-up.

“In my estimation,” wrote a commenter on The New American website, “what they are trying to hide is that what happened at Sandy Hook (as well as at the shooting at the Batman movie not long before that) was a False Flag perpetuated by this administration for the purpose of furthering their on-going attacks upon our Constitutional freedoms and nothing less!!”

On the Courant’s site, a poster from Toronto asked: “Since when in the history of the world do they not publish a DEATH CERTIFICATE? I’ll tell you when… When the death certificate DOES NOT EXIST!”

And on infowars.com, the granddaddy of conspiracy sites, hundreds of comments have been posted in response to the legislation, with many posters knowingly shaking their heads at the obviousness of it all.

“Nice how criminals get to cover up their own crimes and tracks,” one wrote. “Fortunately internet investigators have enough proof of what may have happened that day. One thing is certain: everything around Sandy Hook is a lie, a cover-up or a deception.”

Proponents of the legislation say they merely want to spare the relatives of  those killed at Sandy Hook the trauma that could come from having crime-scene photographs or other grisly details widely released. While typical media outlets refrain from publishing particularly disturbing images, proponents fear that the extraordinarily high profile of the Dec. 14 rampage would attract interest from others who would be willing to splash the images on the Internet.

As drafted, however, the bill goes beyond shielding images, and includes 911 recordings, police transmissions that describe the victims, and the death certificates issued for the 20 students and six educators killed at the school. The bill does not protect images or other records related to shooter Adam Lanza, who fatally shot himself in the school, or his mother, whom he also killed.

Transparency advocates have roundly criticized the proposal, particularly its extension to 911 recordings, which are often used to gauge law-enforcement response. The bill includes a provision for transcripts of such calls, though it is not clear if those transcripts could accurately reflect the tone and timing of the communications. Others question the fairness of legislation aimed at protecting the Sandy Hook families, but not the grieving relatives of other homicide victims.

Lawmakers are debating those points, and the bill might be amended if and when it comes up for a vote. In the meantime, those on the edge are relishing the fresh fodder.

“We already know they lied about assault rifles being used. That’s a proven fact,” one Huffington Post commenter confidently declared. “What are they covering up now?”

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5 thoughts on “‘Conspiracy Nuts’ Relish Sandy Hook Secrecy Bill

  1. Charlie Steinberg

    According to this article, the investigation results would be released with the exception of the 911 calls and victim photos. That means that the surveillance video and photos of Adam will be available, but that is not what the Governor is saying. I’m interested in the deposition by Sally Cox, who was reported to have seen and clearly recognized the gunman as the son of a kindergarten teacher, Scott Vollmer (who works for Bloomburg.) Her sole status as key eye witness, one who could ID the killer, may have been what kept her in a closet for four hours. This info may have been on the 911 calls. Let’s have it.

    Reply
  2. Jason Jaddica

    They don’t have any way forward. Anything that they release would simply draw attention to the gaping holes in this story. I wonder what John Valluzzo discovered? It must be a tense situation in some circles right now, considering that people in Connecticut are figuring out what really happened.

    Name calling, really?

    Reply
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