For First Time, Black Voter Turnout Topped Whites in 2012 Election, New Census Data Show

by Categorized: Census, Data, Politics Date:

For what is likely the first time ever, blacks who were eligible to vote went to the polls at slightly higher rates than whites during the 2012 election in which Barack Obama won a second term, newly released Census data show.

Survey results released Wednesday show that nationally, an estimated 66.2 percent of eligible blacks cast ballots last November, compared to 64.1 percent for non-Hispanic whites. Those rates closed what had been a significant gap in voting by race in the years before Obama was on the ballot. In presidential elections from 1996 to 2004, whites went to the polls at rates 5 to 7 percentage points higher than blacks.

Although blacks voted at higher rates than whites nationally, the numbers varied considerably across the country, the Census Bureau reported. Generally, voter turnout by blacks exceeded whites in the East North Central, East South Central, Middle Atlantic and South Atlantic regions of the country. White turnout generally exceeded that of blacks in the Mountain and Pacific regions.

Asians and Hispanics continued to lag far behind whites and blacks in voter turnout, the Census numbers show, with neither group topping 50 percent nationally.

But while the percentage of eligible Asians and Hispanics who voted dipped in 2012, their raw numbers increased due to demographic shifts in the voting-age population. About 1.8 million more voters went to the polls in 2012 compared to 2008, an increase driven entirely by non-white voters. Overall, 2 million fewer whites cast ballots at the same time there were an additional 1.7 million black voters, 1.4 million Hispanic voters and 550,000 Asian voters.

Non-Hispanic whites still accounted for the great majority of ballots cast last November, but their share is dropping. In 2012, whites made up 73.7  percent of all voters. Twelve years earlier, that figure was 82.5 percent.

The Census numbers also show a continuation of familiar patterns, with higher voting rates among women, those with more education, and those with higher incomes. Voter turnout also generally increases with age.

In Connecticut, total turnout by those eligible to vote slightly exceeded the national average – 62.7 percent for the state compared to 61.8 percent for the country. But blacks in Connecticut did not head to the polls at greater rates than whites. In Connecticut, non-Hispanic white voter turnout, at 65.8 percent, exceeded the national average while black turnout, at 62.2 percent, lagged the nationwide figure.

Census numbers for the state also show that men voted at rates similar to the national average, while women topped the national average by more than a percentage point. Overall in Connecticut. 59.9 percent of eligible men voted, compared to 65.3 percent of women.

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7 thoughts on “For First Time, Black Voter Turnout Topped Whites in 2012 Election, New Census Data Show

  1. Lee Brim

    How come the Courant is not covering the Benghazi hearings? By ignoring it is very telling.

    Reply
    1. Steve

      There is a link to it in national news if you are truly interested in such a truly minor event. Where is the link to number of troops killed searching for WMDs in Iraq? The late ambassador would probably be disgusted by the politicization of his death based on what I have read of his professionalism.

      Reply
      1. Lee Brim

        I hardly think this is a minor event and loosing 4 lives needlessly is less minor than than the trial of loony murderer. The Obama mob lied to us and could have prevented that mess. Only a partisan hack could think this is minor.

        Reply
  2. baborn3

    If you do a Google search you’ll find that some Black Voter Districts had more than 100% of the registered voters.
    Is this a first time too?

    Reply
  3. Brian C. Duffy

    There is just so much to cherrypick here, so why not.

    Apparently, Obama was reelected by the most motivated voter:

    A non-Hispanic, rich, educated, old white woman.

    Have at it CABs….

    Reply
  4. Ashley

    Is it wrong to feel so delighted by all of the new crazy, racist conspiracy-theorists revealing themselves since this came out?

    Reply
  5. Lee

    Looks like low information voters are controlling the nations politics. This is scary and I fear for the long term direction of the country. What is even more scary is how the media is feeding those voters, if they happen to be able to read, with partisan left wing crap. Those voters will also vote to get more free stuff which the Democrats seem to allow at our expense– not to mention the Unsecured borders.

    Reply

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