Take a Peek Inside Every Public Teacher Contract in Connecticut

by Categorized: Data, Education, Non-profits, Politics, Transparency/FOI Date:

ConnCAN, the New Haven-based education-reform group, has slogged through every available public teacher contract in the state and built a database listing salary ranges, number of teaching days, length of workday, class-size limits and other measurements.

“It is important to note that in many places, the contract is a baseline, and there are many teachers and administrators who go above and beyond the minimum requirements in these contracts. For example, we know that many, many teachers work much longer days than what is required in their contract,” ConnCAN wrote in an introduction to the database. “However, when disputes arise or reforms are sought, the contract is a document that guides decisions and work rules and we believe that we must, therefore, look closely at what these contracts stipulate.”

The database includes 173 “local education agencies,” including local public school districts, regional districts, charter schools, and the state vocational-technical high school system. (One district, ACES, is not included due, ConnCAN said, to delays in contract negotiations.) Districts can be compared side-by-side, and ConnCAN has included some analysis of the data and assorted factoids. (“The average salary for a teacher with 5 years of experience and a bachelor’s degree is $48,783.”)

“ConnCAN created this Teacher Contract Database to provide free, public access to teacher collective bargaining agreements for every single school district in Connecticut,” the group said. “These agreements shape local district education policy, and we believe that providing access to this information in a user-friendly, web-based searchable form will be essential to inform the public dialogue on district-level education reform.”

The database is accessible here.

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8 thoughts on “Take a Peek Inside Every Public Teacher Contract in Connecticut

  1. alan

    I have be honest as someone in the personnel industry I am shocked. A teacher starting is making the same as an engineer and can get to 80K plus after 15 years? To make that these days in Conn in private sector you have to stand out- work 55 hr weeks and get a grad degree in enginnering or accounting. Were all these set when Conn was booming? Are the pensions at 70% after 35 years based on the last year at 80K+ If I advertised a job for 80K in pharma(for ex) I would get dozens of high qualified advanced degreed types with 20 years..having taught some college an education degree to pharma/engineering degree is like the guy who won the Wethersfield park rec tennis champ playing in the first round of the US open..same game, same size court, no comparision in skill or effort required

    Reply
    1. only in ct

      I didn’t see any 80k salaries and starting salaries were in the 40′s. Not quite sure what you are talking about.

      Reply
    2. Sue Lebeck

      What are YOU talking about???? Ramble on, fella.
      I’m a newly retired teacher. I started my first job in Cromwell, CT @ $8,004, Sept. 1974. [turned down 15,500 from SNETCO, same time for perspective with private sector]
      It’s about time a teacher’s salary was commensurate with the amount of education and managerial skills needed to be a teacher. Don’t forget a teacher manages from 56- 180+ ‘clients’ a day, WITHOUT A SECRETARY.
      It’s no longer a master’s degree that most seek IMMEDIATELY after college [competition is tough, as you know working personnel]…
      AND TODAY the youngest grads coming out of FIVE years for a bach. degree now are completing their DOCTORATES to stay competitive.

      Psst: here’s a tip for you, Alan: Learn to write..perhaps take a night course from a teacher moonlighting to keep up with the cost of living. You want high, qualified applicants, do you? I’d prefer HIGHLY qualified applicants.

      Reply
  2. Bob

    If you are in the personnel industry you are out of touch. In my field, accounting, junior level (0-3 years) pay is $40K – $60K depending on the size of the firm. Senior level (4-6 years) is $50K – $75K. My daughter is in her 4th year teaching high school science with a masters degree and makes $43K, hardly equal to the accountant in private industry. After her 5th year she will go to $51K and her max would be $72K after many years. So think about the education required to teach for a fair pay compared to private industry accountants.

    Reply
  3. Gregg

    I have a bachelor’s degree in mathematics but I didn’t go into teaching, partly because of the low pay (I easily make $40-$45 an hour as an IT contractor), bully administrators (I have a friend who is an educator who has told me things that have happened at work), and parents who don’t want to take any responsibility for their kid’s education, expect you to do their kids learning for them, and try to coerce you to pass their kid when he gets caught cheating. And I didn’t even have to go for a master’s degree. I realize, however, people go into teaching for reasons other than just the pay, and the fringe benefits are good — e.g. tenure, retirement, and summers off. It isn’t for me, but for many people it is personally rewarding.

    Teachers do need tenure. Otherwise, abusive administrators will fire good but expensive teachers in favor of inexperienced ones that don’t draw as much from the budget. This isn’t right: the kids deserve the best teachers available.

    Reply
  4. Yom Kippur 2013

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    Reply

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