For Fun, Science Center is pushing Math!

Learning math can be fun. At least that’s the hope and belief of the Connecticut Science Center, which invited over 100 students from the Connecticut Pre-Engineering Program (CPEP), to visit their current exhibit called MathAlive!

The exhibit, sponsored nationally by Raytheon and locally by Stanley Black & Decker, uses video games, music, robotics and more to demonstrate and present fundamental math concepts in a fun and enjoyable way to children. Allison Jeannotte, director of community relations for Raytheon, says the defense contractor based in Waltham, Mass., is mostly composed of engineers and the national exhibit is meant to inspire todays children to enter the engineering field. MathAlive! is part of their MathMovesU program and the exhibit began at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC, and is headed next to the Strategic Air & Space Museum in Ashland, Nebraska,

The goal of CPEP’s five week tuition-free Summer Gaming Challenge program is also to inspire and prepare children for future STEM careers but also keep their math skills working during the long summer.  The program serves primarily under-represented middle-school students.  

From left, Aviana Hunter, 12, Janyra Whitmore, 11, sitting on top of Ryan Carpenter, Pierre Khawaja, and Elizabeth Stewart, 11,  strike a pose while playing one of the MathAlive! exhibits at the Science Center in Hartford. The group, from the Waterbury CPEP program, was playing a game called Style Revolution, which teaches the concept of sequencing.

From left, Aviana Hunter, 12, Janyra Whitmore, 11, sitting on top of Ryan Carpenter, Pierre Khawaja, and Elizabeth Stewart, 11, strike a pose while playing one of the MathAlive! exhibits at the Science Center in Hartford. The group, from the Waterbury CPEP program, was playing a game called Style Revolution, which teaches the concept of sequencing.

  • From left, Victoria Farrell, 13, Isaiah Wallace, 14, and Nick Makuch, 12, all with the CPEP program out of New Britain, play a math skills game called Dimension M, in a competition with a children from Waterbury in the auditorium at the science Center in Hartford.
  • Students with the Waterbury CPEP program, left table, battle children from the New Britain CPEP program, play a math-skills game called Dimension M, in an auditorium at the Science Center in Hartford.
  • Elizabeth Stewart, 11, left, and Jaidelice Arce, 12, both students in the Waterbury CPEP program, play a game in the MathAlive! exhibit at the Science Center in Hartford called Style Revolution, which teaches the concept of sequencing.
  • Emmanuel Gonzalez, 11, with the Waterbury CPEP program, watches to see how a paper cone cup, which he had earlier cut with scissors, flies while being blown by a fam. The exhibit, titled Altitude (AGL), was in the Forces in Motion exhibit at the Science Center in Hartford.
  • From left, Nathan Aviles, 13, Nosa Igbinewuare, 14, Kayin Bennett, 12, and Davonte Howard, 13, gather around a game in the MathAlive! exhibit at the Science Center in Hartford.
  • Alexis Diaz, 12, of Waterbury, who attends West Side Middle School, plays a game called, Tessellations, in which children are challenged to create patters that repeat  a game to create patterns that repeat in the MathAlive! exhibit at the Science Center in Hartford.
  • Children from the New Britain CPEP program play a game called BorderCross in the MathAlive! exhibit at the Science Center in Hartford. The game teaches angles and precision balance in the form of a ski race.
  • Gabe Navarro, 12, left, and Isaiah Wallace, 14, both of New Britain, laugh as they play a game called BorderCross in the MathAlive! exhibit at the Science Center in Hartford. Navarro is a student at Diloreto Magnet School in New Britain and Wallace is a student at Annie Fisher Magnet School in Hartford. The game teaches angles and precision balance in the form of a ski race.
  • Students from the New Britain CPEP program participate in an exhibit in the Forces in Motion exhibit at the Science Center in Hartford.

Posted in News & Events, Photojournalism, Richard Messina, Uncategorized and tagged with , , . RSS 2.0 feed.
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