Google Glass comes to Hartford Hospital

I’m a faithful Apple fan, but when William Weir wrote a story on Hartford Hospital’s foray into testing Google Glass, assignment editor “du jour,” Cloe Poisson, was kind enough to send the assignment my way. Hopefully, the photos on the “View More” link below, will provide an idea of the enthusiasm the hospital team had for the new technology.

Doctor Thomas Nowicki, director of Cognitive Simulation at Hartford Hospital's Center for Education Simulation and Innovation, CESI, and the director of the residency program, swipes the Temple of a Google Glass to demonstrate how to interact with the wearable technology. The temple on the Glass acts as a touch pad. Hartford Hospital is evaluating the technology for possible incorporation into their medical center.  An tine image can be seen in the glass just over the eye, which when worn, appears much larger and seems to be floating just above and to the right of the person wearing Google Glass.

Doctor Thomas Nowicki, director of Cognitive Simulation at Hartford Hospital’s Center for Education Simulation and Innovation, CESI, and the director of the residency program, swipes the Temple of a Google Glass to demonstrate how to interact with the wearable technology. The temple on the Glass acts as a touch pad. Hartford Hospital is evaluating the technology for possible incorporation into their medical center. An tine image can be seen in the glass just over the eye, which when worn, appears much larger and seems to be floating just above and to the right of the person wearing Google Glass.

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Hartford Hospital’s CESI simulation technician Chris Madison has been working on creating custom applications for the hospital’s workflow since he entered and won Google’s “If I had Glass” contest.  With the hospitals approval he purchased the beta Glass for $1,500. It was nice to see Madison, the doctors, and administrators banter about ideas on how to implement the wearable technology. But it is was even nicer to try them on, and get an idea of what all the talk is about. Madison said he wore them for almost two weeks straight, and almost became dependent on them because of the way they seamlessly integrate email and text messages from his Android phone onto the screen.

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