The Grandeur of Autumn

Autumn
by: © Julie L. O’Connor
There’s a crispness in the air that greets the morning sun, a feeling of anticipation, a new day has begun.
Harvest days are ending, winter is drawing near, yet in between is surely the most special time of year.
They call it Indian Summer, and it seems to fit the bill, for it’s as if the Lord took a feathered brush and painted all the hills.
For the whole poem click here:
 The first hard frost of the season hit most of central Connecticut on Saturday morning as a maple leaf is outlined with the icy remnants as the sun turns it to dew.

The first hard frost of the season hit most of central Connecticut on Saturday morning as a maple leaf is outlined with the icy remnants as the sun turns it to dew.

I’m often asked this time of year what can I do to improve my foliage photos. I’m not really sure how to answer that since i do not take many “foliage” photos per se but what I try to do is incorporate them into my everyday photojournalism.

I also try to use the sun to my advantage and keep it at 90 degrees or more to my subject so that the color look more vibrant. Fortunately this time of year the sun never really gets high in the sky so almost anytime of day is good for photos. One of my favorite times to shoot foliage is after a light rain which seems to saturate the colors of the leaves and causes the shadow areas of the forest to go darker adding more contrast.

Two other useful tools that I would recommend are a polarizing filter and a graduated neutral density filter. I do not own or use either one but if you want better landscape photos I would highly recommend looking into them. The polarizer will cut down on the glare that can be caused by the sun reflecting off the leaves and will also add a richness to your sky. The neutral density will allow you to balance the overexposure of the sky similar to what a polarizing filter would accomplish.

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Posted in Features, John Woike, Lighting, Nature, News & Events, Photojournalism, Weather. RSS 2.0 feed.
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