Yale Professor, James Rothman, wins 2013 Nobel Prize

James Rothman, Wallace Professor of Biomedical Sciences, Professor and Chairman of Cell Biology, Professor of Chemistry and Executive Director, Yale Center for High Throughput Cell Biology, along with two other scientists won the 2013 Nobel Prize in medicine for their work on how hormones and enzymes are transported within and outside cells, giving insight into diseases such as diabetes and Alzheimer’s. Rothman shared the award with Randy W. Schekman of the University of California, Berkeley, and Dr. Thomas C. Südhof of Stanford University.

Rothman received a standing ovation from his graduate course, Cell Biology, which he taught after the press conference announcing his award. The students were all wearing toy medals around their necks, and left one for him to put on before his lecture. His lectern was also lined with trophies.

Rothman received a standing ovation from his graduate course, Cell Biology, which he taught after the press conference announcing his award. The students were all wearing toy medals around their necks, and left one for him to put on before his lecture. His lectern was also lined with trophies.

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