Archive

3rd Annual Pooch Plunge

The Bristol Parks and Recreation Department held their 3rd Annual Pooch Plunge at Rockwell Park Monday evening. About 30 dogs, and their owners, came out to cool off and take the plunge as a good way to end the summer season.

 

3rd-Annual-Pooch-Plunge-02

For more photos:

Archive

Whale of a Sail: The Charles W. Morgan’s 38th Voyage

MorganBlogLede

Serving as nautical backdrops to a day of whale watching, the Charles W. Morgan and the Mystic schooner survey a flat, blue Atlantic seascape as a spouting humpback whale feeds on sand lance (also known as sand eels) within the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary just north of Provincetown, Massachusetts on July 12. Accompanied by the Mystic, the Morgan and a small flotilla of research vessels traveled three nautical miles off the tip of Cape Cod to visit the primary feeding ground for humpback whales. With a rich and perhaps a checkered past of whale hunting and harpooning, the Morgan has now partnered with Mystic Seaport and NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) to raise awareness about the endangered humpbacks and other whale species. The Morgan will be visiting several ports of call in the Northeast this summer.

VIEW MORE

VIEW VIDEO

Archive

Connecticut Mission of Mercy Free Dental Clinic

Hundreds turned out Friday at the XL Center seeking free dental care offered by hundreds of volunteers.

 Brenda Davis, of Plymouth, blows a kiss to staff after getting a tooth extracted. She and hundreds of others were in line early Friday seeking free dental care staffed by volunteer dentists and assistants in a makeshift clinic. The CT MOM Free Dental Clinic at the XL Center in Hartford offered a full range of dental services on a first come first served basis starting at 6 A.M. Friday. More than 700 walked through the doors four hours later. The clinic continues Saturday.

Brenda Davis, of Plymouth, blows a kiss to staff after getting a tooth extracted. She and hundreds of others were in line early Friday seeking free dental care staffed by volunteer dentists and assistants in a makeshift clinic. The CT MOM Free Dental Clinic at the XL Center in Hartford offered a full range of dental services on a first come first served basis starting at 6 A.M. Friday. More than 700 walked through the doors four hours later. The clinic continues Saturday.

VIEW MORE

Archive

Farmington Valley Arts Center

The Farmington Valley Arts Center in Avon is celebrating it’s 40th year. Its a place for artists to learn, create, display and sell their art work.

C. Dianne Zweig, a mixed media artist, uses collage to create abstract images in her studio at the Farmington Valley Arts Center.

C. Dianne Zweig, a mixed media artist, uses collage to create abstract images in her studio at the Farmington Valley Arts Center.

 

VIEW MORE

 

Archive

Coaches Against Cancer

Nearly forty people signed up to have their heads shaved for the St. Baldrick’s Foundation fund-raiser at Vaughn’s Public House Tuesday night in Hartford.

Juliette LaRock (C) reacts as Jane Dunbar (L) holds up her ponytail which was just cutoff during a fund-raiser for The St. Baldrick's Foundation at Vaughn's Public House in Hartford Tuesday evening. Nearly forty people, mostly young girls, attended the event that was started by Jon Cohn, a Manchester soccer coach, who learned of the foundation in 2009. Juliette's twin sister Camille (R) looks on as her ponytail is prepared for cutting. The St. Baldrick’s head-shaving events began as a challenge between businessmen and have grown from one event in 2000 to over 1,300 events in 2012, raising critical funds for childhood cancer research. Events take place in pubs, restaurants, schools, churches, parks, malls, military bases, firehouses and any other place you can imagine, according to their website.

Juliette LaRock (C) reacts as Jane Dunbar (L) holds up her ponytail which was just cutoff during a fund-raiser for The St. Baldrick’s Foundation at Vaughn’s Public House in Hartford Tuesday evening. Nearly forty people, mostly young girls, attended the event that was started by Jon Cohn, a Manchester soccer coach, who learned of the foundation in 2009. Juliette’s twin sister Camille (R) looks on as her ponytail is prepared for cutting. The St. Baldrick’s head-shaving events began as a challenge between businessmen and have grown from one event in 2000 to over 1,300 events in 2012, raising critical funds for childhood cancer research. Events take place in pubs, restaurants, schools, churches, parks, malls, military bases, firehouses and any other place you can imagine, according to their website.

For more photos click here:

Archive

Dirt Floor Recording Studio

The hills are alive, with the sound of music…. Alright, I mean the woods are alive, in Chester anyway where Eric Lichter has made quite a name for himself producing music at his Dirt Floor Studio. For the whole story by Jason Simms click here:

James Maple and Eric Lichter goof around in the studio while cutting a new single for Maple's upcoming recording. Lichter is the owner and operator of Dirt Floor recording studio in Chester. Eric Lichter grew up in CT and after living in NYC for much of his 20s returned to open a recording studio, now located in a historic home in downtown Chester. This operation is different because he records to tape using vintage equipment, he coaches artists and he'll play whatever instrument needed.

James Maple and Eric Lichter goof around in the studio while cutting a new single for Maple’s upcoming recording. Lichter is the owner and operator of Dirt Floor recording studio in Chester. Eric Lichter grew up in CT and after living in NYC for much of his 20s returned to open a recording studio, now located in a historic home in downtown Chester. This operation is different because he records to tape using vintage equipment, he coaches artists and he’ll play whatever instrument needed.

The place is set back from the road on a shared driveway that splits halfway up. I walked into the house and Springsteen was playing on the turntable, a man with a ‘fro from the 70′s stepped up and greeted me with a smile, hi, I’m Eric Lichter. It was like a flashback to the seventies, he reminded me of a young Bob Dylan with the hair and sunglasses, or was it Sly Stone or, Jimi. Wasn’t sure but I could tell there was a good vibe going on as I was introduced to James Maple, Dustin Meadows and Studio Manager Scott “Skip” Lyons. Maple was there to cut a new song and I had the privilege to spend the next couple hours emersed in the artistry as they weaved a song from bare acoustic guitar, raw vocals and a variety of instruments that both Lichter and Maple would play for background harmony. For more photos click here:

Here’s a short video I put together of my time spent with the crew at Dirt Floor:

Archive

Chuckles VIII Predicts More Winter

Manchester Mayor Leo V. Diana listens closely to devine what groundhog Chuckles VIII predicts while Rachel Hadyka, manager of educational services at the Lutz Children's Museum and licensed wildlife rehabilitator wait in anticipation whether we will have 6 more weeks of winter. Chuckles VIII, a resident at the museum in Manchester, saw her shadow and predicted 6 more weeks of winter. Hundreds turned out early Sunday morning Groundhog Day to hear Chuckles' weather advisory.

Manchester Mayor Leo V. Diana listens closely to devine what groundhog Chuckles VIII predicts while Rachel Hadyka, manager of educational services at the Lutz Children’s Museum and licensed wildlife rehabilitator wait in anticipation whether we will have 6 more weeks of winter. Chuckles VIII, a resident at the museum in Manchester, saw her shadow and predicted 6 more weeks of winter. Hundreds turned out early Sunday morning Groundhog Day to hear Chuckles’ weather advisory.

 

VIEW MORE

Archive

Bill Covitz – Ice Sculptor

Bill Covitz didn’t know where he would wind up after graduating from the Culinary Institute of America in 1991 with the desire to be a chef but for the past 14 years he has mastered the art of carving ice.

Bill Covitz uses a hand grinder to clean and smooth the face of a "Martini Luge" for an upcoming engagement party. Two blocks with the initial of each person is engraved into the front, a plastic martini glass is fitted into the top by carving out the ice then a large dremel is used to carve a flowing groove for the tube that will carry the martini mixture through block to a waiting glass for the consumer of the drink.

Bill Covitz uses a hand grinder to clean and smooth the face of a “Martini Luge” for an upcoming engagement party. Two blocks with the initial of each person is engraved into the front, a plastic martini glass is fitted into the top by carving out the ice then a large dremel is used to carve a flowing groove for the tube that will carry the martini mixture through block to a waiting glass for the consumer of the drink.

VIEW MORE:

Archive

Super Bowl XLVIII

The Denver Broncos and Seattle Seahawks will play for the NFL Championship at MetLife Stadium on Sunday, February, 2, 2014. The week leading up to big game turns into a media circus and for the football fan the NFL has created the largest “Fan Festival” by blocking off over a dozen city blocks in Times Square with a variety of events. I will try give a glimpse of the things I encounter along the way with a series of Instagram photos.

Hope you enjoy…

Gearing up for the "Big Game", I went out and purchased a new hat for Super Bowl XLVIII, MAD BOMBER meet @AngryJohnnie. It's supposed to be a cold night, but hey it is New England after all.

Gearing up for the “Big Game”, I went out and purchased a new hat for Super Bowl XLVIII, MAD BOMBER meet @AngryJohnnie. It’s supposed to be a cold night, but hey it is New England after all.

To follow along VIEW HERE:

Archive

Sugar Plum Dream

In 2004, former Courant photographer John Long produced a picture page on Gabrielle Collins, of West Hartford, who was a young dancer studying at the Ballet Theatre Company Academy.  Collins, 8 1/2 at the time, was rehearsing for her role as a mouse in the Academy’s production of “The Nutcracker.”  Long’s photos captured the young Collins’ natural stage presence and passion for her craft.

Now 17, and a senior at Conard High School with a 4.1 GPA, Collins is performing the role of the Sugar Plum Fairy in the Hartt School Community Division‘s production of “The Nutcracker” this weekend at Millard Auditorium on the University of Hartford campus. Collins, who started dancing at age 6, is realizing her dream to dance the leading role in the Christmas classic.

“Being the Sugar Plum has always been my dream ever since I started dancing as a little girl,” said Collins. “When I was Clara in ‘The Nutcracker’ I would sit in the throne and watch the Sugar Plum dance from the side of the stage and I just always remember being like, I want to do that one day,” she said.

Now a trainee in the Community Division’s pre-professional program, Collins plans to become a professional ballet dancer. After graduating from Conard in the spring, Collins hopes to land a job with a ballet company, or plans to enroll in a dance program at a university.

The Hartt pre-professional program is rigorous and requires training six days a week. Collins has had additional training at summer intensive programs at American Ballet Theater and the Joffrey Ballet, both in New York City, and the Pittsburgh Ballet Theater.

“She’s very hungry, very passionate about what she’s doing,” said Samantha Dunster, artistic director and chair of Hartt’s Community Division dance department.  “Gabby has a very strong technique, but it’s not just the technique. It’s the passion, the artistry she has,” said Dunster.

Starting Monday, Collins will begin training for the Youth America Grand Prix, the world’s largest international student dance competition, to be held in Providence, Rhode Island, in February.

Now on the threshold of what promises to be a successful career, we revisit Collins as she realizes her dream.

WEST HARTFORD 11/11/04  At the studios of the Ballet Theatre Company in West Hartford center, the mice wait to go on during a rehearsal. Gabrielle Collins, left, plays the White Mouse. Left to right are the bigger mice, Erin Lytwyn, Liz Cook, Lauren Noble and Charlotte Clune.   Gabrielle studies all the other dancers during rehearsals and has learned many of the other roles just by watching. She loves dancing and thinks (at the early age of eight and a half) that she wants to be a professional someday. Courant photo by John Long

WEST HARTFORD 11/11/04 At the studios of the Ballet Theatre Company in West Hartford center, the mice wait to go on during a rehearsal. Gabrielle Collins, left, plays the White Mouse. Left to right are the bigger mice, Erin Lytwyn, Liz Cook, Lauren Noble and Charlotte Clune. Gabrielle studies all the other dancers during rehearsals and has learned many of the other roles just by watching. She loves dancing and thinks (at the early age of eight and a half) that she wants to be a professional someday. Courant photo by John Long

VIEW MORE

 

Archive

A Time For Giving Thanks

Living in an increasingly divided, tumultuous and complicated world, the Thanksgiving holiday offers an opportunity to truly reflect on our personal blessings. For many, the value of these blessings is even more treasured as they reflect on times of struggle. To some, adversity came long ago. Others are in the midst of difficult challenges today. Yet finding genuine reasons to be thankful can help us to persevere. There is a time to focus on our troubles for it helps us to recognize them, confront them and, with luck, overcome them. But our nature also demands time for reflection, which helps us establish our priorities, realize how much we depend upon each other, and remain humble. Here we offer you the stories of a few individuals who have faced challenges in their lives, and their brief reflections on what makes them grateful.

I asked one question “What are you thankful for?”

Giving Thanks

Dan Crowley, Simsbury

On April 9, 1942, U.S. General Edward King surrendered to the Japanese army after a battle on the Philippine peninsula of Bataan. Dan Crowley and a group of other soldiers didn’t obey that order — they fought on. Swimming to the small island of Corregidor, in Manila Bay, Private Crowley somehow dodged the artillery for nearly a month before being forced to surrender. The horrific World War II event that followed is now known as the Bataan Death March. U.S. and Philippine soldiers suffered unspeakable atrocities, and later, Crowley was enslaved 2,000 feet underground in a copper mine until Japan finally surrendered in September of 1945. Through the years, Crowley shared those memories with a fellow P.O.W. and best friend, Harry Johnson, who also survived the experience after being lucky enough to be dug out of a pile of corpses when someone heard him moan. That friendship ended three years ago at the passing of that kindred soul. Over the last year or so, Crowley also lost his wife of sixty-six years to cancer, and has been pre-deceased by his sixty-two-year-old son.

Crowley answers my question about thankfulness and shares his stories with so much passion and perspective.

“I’m thankful to be alive. Thankful that I was somehow chosen to still be alive. All my friends, who I was with in the rotten Japanese slave labor camps are dead,” he says sitting in the drivers seat of his bright red 1997 Mustang Cobra sports car. “I savor life, the Simsbury resident says. “I was in bad shape for a while. No corporation would hire us, when we got home. I went out and sold on my own for straight commission.” Crowley is also grateful for his family, especially his father who he learned so much from, and his wife, who’s parting advice to him was to find a young woman and enjoy life. So what is he doing with the life he is lucky to keep living? “Eat, sleep and make love,” he punctuates with a hearty and sustained laughter.

At 2:00 p.m. on December 7, the state of Connecticut is dedicating a bridge in the Weatogue section of Simsbury the “Bataan Corregidor Memorial Bridge.” Crowley will be communication with the pilots to perfectly time the military fly-over.

“I’m thankful that finally recognition is being given to the memory of the men of Connecticut and throughout the United states,” he says. Crowley has led the effort for years, saying, “his is not about veterans, it’s about those who died in the battle and aftermath as prisoner slave laborers. They must not be forgotten.”

VIEW FOUR MORE  STORIES HERE

Archive

Idyllic I-Park

I-Park is an artist’s retreat nestled on 450 wooded acres in East Haddam where artists can go for four-week residencies to create in peaceful seclusion.  Six artists are chosen by jury for each residency, including writers, visual artists, musicians, sculptors, architects and landscape designers.  Artists live in the park’s main house and work in assigned studio spaces.  A lovely path takes visitors around a large pond where they can see various ephemeral installations left behind by artists from I-Park’s Environmental Art Biennale, a three-week program that takes place every two years for artists to create site-specific pieces.  I-Park, a non-profit foundation, will hold an open house on Sunday, November 24, where visitors can meet the current artists in residence and tour the idyllic grounds. To learn more about the artist’s enclave, read Susan Dunne’s story here.

EAST HADDAM 10/30/13 An ephemeral art installation called "Clytia" by Tatiana Ferahian, an artist from Cyprus, made with sunglass lenses strung together in the pattern of a sunflower seed head, is suspended between two trees at I-Park.  CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

EAST HADDAM 10/30/13 An ephemeral art installation called “Clytia” by Tatiana Ferahian, an artist from Cyprus, made with sunglass lenses strung together in the pattern of a sunflower seed head, is suspended between two trees at I-Park. CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

VIEW MORE

Archive

CCC Boy’s Soccer Semifinal

Berlin struck first after Michael Lathrop scored with 11:25 remaining in the first period against Farmington at Middletown high School Monday evening during their CCC soccer semifinal. Colin Cheesman scored the tying goal with 4:20 left and then struck the winning goal for Farmington with 34 seconds remaining in the second period for a 3-2 victory and Farmington will play RHAM on Wednesday night at Middletown High School for the championship.

Colin Cheesman (second from left) is mobbed by teammates Nicholas Mello (L), Kamil Kolacz, #11, Evan Peluso, #10, and Evan Hughes (R) after his goal with 34 seconds remaining in the second period gave Farmington a 3-2 victory against Berlin in the CCC soccer tournament semifinal at Middletown High School Monday evening. Cheesman also scored the tying goal with 4:20 left.

Colin Cheesman (second from left) is mobbed by teammates Nicholas Mello (L), Kamil Kolacz, #11, Evan Peluso, #10, and Evan Hughes (R) after his goal with 34 seconds remaining in the second period gave Farmington a 3-2 victory against Berlin in the CCC soccer tournament semifinal at Middletown High School Monday evening. Cheesman also scored the tying goal with 4:20 left.

VIEW MORE:

Archive

The Grandeur of Autumn

Autumn
by: © Julie L. O’Connor
There’s a crispness in the air that greets the morning sun, a feeling of anticipation, a new day has begun.
Harvest days are ending, winter is drawing near, yet in between is surely the most special time of year.
They call it Indian Summer, and it seems to fit the bill, for it’s as if the Lord took a feathered brush and painted all the hills.
For the whole poem click here:
 The first hard frost of the season hit most of central Connecticut on Saturday morning as a maple leaf is outlined with the icy remnants as the sun turns it to dew.

The first hard frost of the season hit most of central Connecticut on Saturday morning as a maple leaf is outlined with the icy remnants as the sun turns it to dew.

I’m often asked this time of year what can I do to improve my foliage photos. I’m not really sure how to answer that since i do not take many “foliage” photos per se but what I try to do is incorporate them into my everyday photojournalism.

I also try to use the sun to my advantage and keep it at 90 degrees or more to my subject so that the color look more vibrant. Fortunately this time of year the sun never really gets high in the sky so almost anytime of day is good for photos. One of my favorite times to shoot foliage is after a light rain which seems to saturate the colors of the leaves and causes the shadow areas of the forest to go darker adding more contrast.

Two other useful tools that I would recommend are a polarizing filter and a graduated neutral density filter. I do not own or use either one but if you want better landscape photos I would highly recommend looking into them. The polarizer will cut down on the glare that can be caused by the sun reflecting off the leaves and will also add a richness to your sky. The neutral density will allow you to balance the overexposure of the sky similar to what a polarizing filter would accomplish.

View More:

 

Archive

Greenpeace Captain Peter Willcox

More than a month after Norwalk native Peter Willcox was arrested by Russian authorities on a piracy charge during a Greenpeace protest in the Arctic, his wife, Maggy Willcox, talked to him on Monday for the first time since the ordeal began.

“He sounded strong and positive,” she said of her husband, the 60-year-old captain of the Greenpeace ship Arctic Sunrise, which was towed to shore by the Russians. Dubbed the Arctic 30, 28 members of Greenpeace, plus a photographer and a videographer, have been in custody since two activists tried to hang a banner on an oil rig to protest drilling on Sept. 18. For the rest of Christine Dempsey’s story click here:

Maggy Willcox has a photocopy of her husband, Capt. Peter Willcox of Greenpeace, who is being held in Russia on piracy charges, taped to the back window of her car. Willcox, his crew and his ship - The Arctic Sunrise, were remanded in the Barents Sea and towed to shore by the Russian government. Willcox put the charges this way: "The whole charge of piracy is ludicrous."

Maggy Willcox has a photocopy of her husband, Capt. Peter Willcox of Greenpeace, who is being held in Russia on piracy charges, taped to the back window of her car. Willcox, his crew and his ship – The Arctic Sunrise, were remanded in the Barents Sea and towed to shore by the Russian government. Willcox put the charges this way: “The whole charge of piracy is ludicrous.”

VIEW MORE:

Archive

A Yellow Ribbon Welcome

Ann R. McLaughlin started the “Yellow Ribbon” ceremony a few years back when her grandson left for a tour in the middle east and then eventually when he came home, and now she does it for all of the East Hampton kids that are serving in the military. They put yellow ribbons on a small tree on Main Street when they leave and then cut them off when they come home. On Sunday the town honored three veterans that recently returned from Afghanistan – U.S. Army Specialist Matthew Kelly, his brother U.S. Army Master Sgt. Paul Valvo and U. S. Army Staff Sgt. Alicia Valli.

Patriot Guard Riders hold onto American Flags as they encircle the tree on Main Street that holds the names of all the veterans from East Hampton that are currently serving in the military overseas.

Patriot Guard Riders hold onto American Flags as they encircle the tree on Main Street that holds the names of all the veterans from East Hampton that are currently serving in the military overseas.

VIEW MORE:

Archive

Cross Country Championship at Wickham Park

Wickham Park in Manchester was the setting for the CCC Cross Country championships Wednesday afternoon. Hall’s Ari Klau helped the boy’s team to the title and Tolland took home the girls. “We came here to have fun today and not worry too much about winning,” said Tolland coach Judi Lafontaine. “My girls are fighters and they don’t know how to do anything else but win right now.”

With the Hartford skyline and the fall foliage as a backdrop the varsity girls make their way across a field near the start of the race. — John Woike / Hartford Courant, Oct. 16, 2013

With the Hartford skyline and the fall foliage as a backdrop the varsity girls make their way across a field near the start of the race. — John Woike / Hartford Courant, Oct. 16, 2013

VIEW MORE:

Archive

Slackline 101

Slacklining is a practice in balance that typically uses nylon or polyester webbing tensioned between two anchor points. Many people suggest slacklining is distinct from tightrope walking in that the line is not held rigidly taut (although it is still under some tension); it is instead dynamic, stretching and bouncing like a long and narrow trampoline. The line’s tension can be adjusted to suit the user and different types of webbing can be used to achieve a variety of feats. The line itself is usually flat, due to the nature of webbing, thus keeping one’s footing from rolling as would be the case with an ordinary rope. The dynamic nature of the line allows for tricks and stunts. Slacklining has quickly become popular due to its simplicity and versatility and its ability to be practiced in a variety of environments. Those who participate in slacklining are often called “slackers”.[1] -Credit Wikipedia

Caroline Smith, of Lexington, Ky, practices her slacklining between two trees in the Davenport College courtyard at Yale as a sliver of the moon rises Tuesday evening. Smith is a senior majoring in psychology and finds this form of exercise is very relaxing, similar to yoga requiring balance and calmness.

Caroline Smith, of Lexington, Ky, practices her slacklining between two trees in the Davenport College courtyard at Yale as a sliver of the moon rises Tuesday evening. Smith is a senior majoring in psychology and finds this form of exercise is very relaxing, similar to yoga requiring balance and calmness.

Archive

Going To The Dog Show German Style

Beardsley Park in Bridgeport was the site for the 2013 North American Sieger Show where more than 200 World Class German Shepherds from all over the U.S. and foreign countries competed in a European-Style Ring Show. The three day event was held rain or shine.

Thomas Schoder walks Nando Av Locathelli around the ring during the 18-24 month male dog class during the North American WUSV Sieger Show Sunday afternoon. Nando took third place for the class.

Thomas Schoder walks Nando Av Locathelli around the ring during the 18-24 month male dog class during the North American WUSV Sieger Show Sunday afternoon. Nando took third place for the class. Schoder, originally from Germany, now lives in Indiana and is a national training director for the GSDCA, German Shepherd Dog Club of America.

VIEW MORE:

Archive

Fresh Beer Is Fragile!

Connecticut craft breweries have been popping up all over the state, to the delight of local beer lovers. Beermakers are exhibiting their brews at facilities around the Nutmeg State, offering tastings and tours and filling growlers for eager drinkers, Two Roads Brewery in Stratford is just one of them.

James Proulx is not just a tour guide/bartender at Two Roads Brewery in Stratford, he's also a quality control analysts so he can deliver a comprehensive explanation to anyone that takes the one hour tour. Proulx is holding up a glass of finished beer in his left had and a glass of unfiltered beer straight out of the vat to show the brew in its different stages.

James Proulx is not just a tour guide/bartender at Two Roads Brewery in Stratford, he’s also a quality control analysts so he can deliver a comprehensive explanation to anyone that takes the one hour tour. Proulx is holding up a glass of finished beer in his left had and a glass of unfiltered beer straight out of the vat to show the brew in its different stages.

VIEW MORE

Archive

First Day of School

Jill Terry tries to settle some apprehension by her daughter Leah Terry, 5, in the Waddell School playground before the children, escorted by parents, entered for the first day of kindergarten class Wednesday morning.

Jill Terry tries to settle some apprehension by her daughter Leah Terry, 5, in the Waddell School playground before the children, escorted by parents, entered for the first day of kindergarten class Wednesday morning.

 

VIEW MORE

Archive

Beatrice Fox Auerbach Exhibit

The Mandell Jewish Community Center in West Hartford has mounted an exhibit, “Beatrice Fox Auerbach: The Woman, Her World and Her Wardrobe.”  The exhibit includes historical photographs of Fox Auerbach as well as several articles of clothing and accessories that she once owned.  The exhibit will be on display until September 27.

Several outfits once worn by Beatrice Fox Auerbach are on display at the exhibit.

Several outfits once worn by Beatrice Fox Auerbach are on display at the exhibit.

VIEW MORE

Archive

WNBA All-Stars Practice – “It’s Like a Dream”

The WNBA All-Star game was held at the Mohegan Sun Arena this past Saturday and on Friday the stars came out to practice and the public was invited to join in the festivities.

They have been the “Three to See.” Center Brittney Griner, forward Elena Delle Donne and guard Skylar Diggins, but that turned into the “Three Who Will Watch.”

Diggins, playing for the struggling Tulsa Shock, was not chosen for the All-Star team in the Western Conference.

Delle Donne, the former Delaware All-American and top vote-getter for the game, suffered a concussion playing in Wednesday’s game in Washington and was formally ruled out of the game Friday. In fact, Delle Donne will not even attend the game because of her medical condition.

And Griner, the 6-8 tower of terror from Baylor, the league’s top draft pick by Phoenix, was pulled from the game — and the Western Conference’s starting lineup — on Thursday because of a lingering knee injury.

Of the three, Griner was the only one in attendance, and when Dani Krapf, 12, of Lisbon got the attention of her favorite player from across the court, well, Krapf said it best  “It’s like a dream”.

Dani Krapf was wearing the jersey of her favorite player when she attended the WNBA All-Star practice Friday afternoon and even though Brittney Griner wouldn't be playing in the game, due to a lingering knee injury, it didn't stop her from making this little girl have the experience of her life.

Dani Krapf was wearing the jersey of her favorite player when she attended the WNBA All-Star practice Friday afternoon and even though Brittney Griner wouldn’t be playing in the game it didn’t stop her from making this little girl have the experience of her life.

Read More »