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Cold Weather Care

Melissa Greenbacker can’t take a day off because of arctic-like temperatures.  She has 20 calves to take care of at Greenbacker Farm in Durham.  At 7:00 a.m., as the sun is just peeking over the horizon, Greenbacker dresses in layers and heads out into frigid 5-degree weather to care for her young charges who live in hutches next to the farm’s dairy barn. After giving them  water, milk and grain, she cleans their hutches. To help keep them warm, she dresses them in jackets during the coldest months and gives them a double layer of hay. “I take better care of the calves than I do myself!” she said. “You can’t do anything about the weather, so I just keep thinking about the warmer months to come.” As for the cows, they prefer colder weather.  “Over 70 degrees, they start to feel heat stress,” she said.

Greenbacker is a 12th generation farmer at the dairy farm that dates back to the 1720s.  Originally located in Meriden and Wallingford, the Greenbackers moved to Durham in the 1980s to a 410-acre spread that straddles Rt. 68.  A Cornell graduate with a degree in animal science, she opted to return to the farm after graduation rather than becoming a veterinarian because she loves working on the farm even though the work is hard and unending.  But the weather? “It’s part of farming,” she said.

DURHAM 01/08/14 Melissa Greenbacker feeds Eve, a calf born on New Years Eve, with a nipple bucket at Greenbacker Farm in 5-degree weather Wednesday morning. Greenbacker spends each morning feeding and watering the 20 calves on the Durham dairy farm.  CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

DURHAM 01/08/14 Melissa Greenbacker feeds Eve, a calf born on New Years Eve, with a nipple bucket at Greenbacker Farm in 5-degree weather Wednesday morning. Greenbacker spends each morning feeding and watering the 20 calves on the Durham dairy farm. CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

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Huskies Vanquish Knights

The UConn women’s basketball team added another game to the win column when they visited the University of Central Florida Knights at UCF Arena in Orlando, Florida, on New Years Day.  In UConn’s second game playing in the new American Athletic Conference, they moved into the Knight’s house, with a large Husky fan section in tow, and rolled to a 77-49 victory. Stefanie Dolson rang in the new year with a 25 point, 12 rebound performance. Read John Altavilla’s game story here.

ORLANDO, FL 01/01/14 UConn Huskies guard Brianna Banks (13) grabs a loose ball from UCF Knights forward/center Erika Jones (55) in the first half against UCF at UCF Arena Wednesday.  UConn beat the Knights, 77-49. CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@couant.com

ORLANDO, FL 01/01/14 UConn Huskies guard Brianna Banks (13) grabs a loose ball from UCF Knights forward/center Erika Jones (55) in the first half against UCF at UCF Arena Wednesday. UConn beat the Knights, 77-49. CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@couant.com

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Holy Land Cross Rises Again

A new 57-foot cross was lifted into place Friday afternoon atop Pine Hill, the site of the former Holy Land, U.S.A.,  in Waterbury, replacing a similar one that marked the religious attraction for many years. The new cross, which will be illuminated with 5,000 LED bulbs in a lighting ceremony Sunday evening, will be visible along the I-84 and Rt. 8 corridors in Waterbury. The project was made possible by a group of local business owners and the board of directors of Holy Land Waterbury, LLC, a non-profit group that now owns the 17-acre property.  All materials and labor were donated. Read Bernie Davidow’s story here.

WATERBURY 12/20/13 A worker directs a crane operator in the lifting of the new cross at Holy Land in Waterbury as it was put in place Friday afternoon. The new cross, measuring 57 feet tall and 26 feet across and weighing 16 tons, will be illuminated with 5,000 LED bulbs that will last for about 25 years.  CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

WATERBURY 12/20/13 A worker directs a crane operator in the lifting of the new cross at Holy Land in Waterbury as it was put in place Friday afternoon. The new cross, measuring 57 feet tall and 26 feet across and weighing 16 tons, will be illuminated with 5,000 LED bulbs that will last for about 25 years. CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

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Pistapaug Mountain Trail

The Pistapaug Mountain trail leads hikers on a moderate climb to the top of the 700-foot mountain, a traprock ridge in Durham.  Once on top, views of Pistapaug Pond unfold below with rolling hills and farmland dotted with red barns visible on the other side.  The trail is maintained by the Connecticut Forest & Park Association and is marked by easy-to-follow blue blazes, part of the Mattabesett Trail system. Blanketed by a fresh snowfall, the first of the season, a recent hike up the mountain was hushed and tranquil.  Read Peter Marteka’s column about the trail here.

DURHAM 12/11/13 A feather lies in the snow atop Pistapaug Mountain along the Mattabesett Trail in Durham. CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@couant.com

DURHAM 12/11/13 A feather lies in the snow atop Pistapaug Mountain along the Mattabesett Trail in Durham. CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@couant.com

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Sugar Plum Dream

In 2004, former Courant photographer John Long produced a picture page on Gabrielle Collins, of West Hartford, who was a young dancer studying at the Ballet Theatre Company Academy.  Collins, 8 1/2 at the time, was rehearsing for her role as a mouse in the Academy’s production of “The Nutcracker.”  Long’s photos captured the young Collins’ natural stage presence and passion for her craft.

Now 17, and a senior at Conard High School with a 4.1 GPA, Collins is performing the role of the Sugar Plum Fairy in the Hartt School Community Division‘s production of “The Nutcracker” this weekend at Millard Auditorium on the University of Hartford campus. Collins, who started dancing at age 6, is realizing her dream to dance the leading role in the Christmas classic.

“Being the Sugar Plum has always been my dream ever since I started dancing as a little girl,” said Collins. “When I was Clara in ‘The Nutcracker’ I would sit in the throne and watch the Sugar Plum dance from the side of the stage and I just always remember being like, I want to do that one day,” she said.

Now a trainee in the Community Division’s pre-professional program, Collins plans to become a professional ballet dancer. After graduating from Conard in the spring, Collins hopes to land a job with a ballet company, or plans to enroll in a dance program at a university.

The Hartt pre-professional program is rigorous and requires training six days a week. Collins has had additional training at summer intensive programs at American Ballet Theater and the Joffrey Ballet, both in New York City, and the Pittsburgh Ballet Theater.

“She’s very hungry, very passionate about what she’s doing,” said Samantha Dunster, artistic director and chair of Hartt’s Community Division dance department.  “Gabby has a very strong technique, but it’s not just the technique. It’s the passion, the artistry she has,” said Dunster.

Starting Monday, Collins will begin training for the Youth America Grand Prix, the world’s largest international student dance competition, to be held in Providence, Rhode Island, in February.

Now on the threshold of what promises to be a successful career, we revisit Collins as she realizes her dream.

WEST HARTFORD 11/11/04  At the studios of the Ballet Theatre Company in West Hartford center, the mice wait to go on during a rehearsal. Gabrielle Collins, left, plays the White Mouse. Left to right are the bigger mice, Erin Lytwyn, Liz Cook, Lauren Noble and Charlotte Clune.   Gabrielle studies all the other dancers during rehearsals and has learned many of the other roles just by watching. She loves dancing and thinks (at the early age of eight and a half) that she wants to be a professional someday. Courant photo by John Long

WEST HARTFORD 11/11/04 At the studios of the Ballet Theatre Company in West Hartford center, the mice wait to go on during a rehearsal. Gabrielle Collins, left, plays the White Mouse. Left to right are the bigger mice, Erin Lytwyn, Liz Cook, Lauren Noble and Charlotte Clune. Gabrielle studies all the other dancers during rehearsals and has learned many of the other roles just by watching. She loves dancing and thinks (at the early age of eight and a half) that she wants to be a professional someday. Courant photo by John Long

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Anita Schorr, Holocaust Survivor

Anita Schorr, 83, of Westport, is a Holocaust survivor.  On Tuesday, she visited Vinal Technical High School in Middletown, to share her story.  Born in Czechoslovakia, she is the only member of her family to have survived the Nazi’s attempt to obliterate the Jews.  At age 13, she was sent to Auschwitz concentration camp and later to Bergen-Belsen, from which she was liberated in 1945.  After emigrating to the U.S. in 1959, she remained silent about her experiences for many years.  But a visit to the Holocaust Museum in Washington D.C. when it opened 20 years ago changed her.  She could no longer keep silent. Since then, Schorr has spoken to hundreds of groups in Connecticut and New York about her experiences.  Her goal is to teach people to not stand by when atrocities occur.  “The free world stood silent,” while the Holocaust unfolded, she said.  She hopes it never happens again.

MIDDLETOWN 12/03/13 Holocaust survivor Anita Schorr, of Westport, describes the constant hunger and fear she endured as a prisoner at Auschwitz concentration camp to students at Vinal Technical High School in Middletown. CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

MIDDLETOWN 12/03/13 Holocaust survivor Anita Schorr, of Westport, describes the constant hunger and fear she endured as a prisoner at Auschwitz concentration camp to students at Vinal Technical High School in Middletown. CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

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End Of An Era

The Kogut family has farmed at Hemlock HIll Christmas Tree Farm in Somers for 27 years, developing a loyal clientele of families who make cutting their Christmas tree there an annual tradition.  The Koguts will close the farm for good at the end of the season when the lease on the 60-acre spread expires.  It’s a bittersweet ending for the family who have helped create a holiday tradition for so many. “It’s the end of an era,” said Kathy Kogut.  For more on the Koguts and Hemlock HIll, read Mara Lee’s story here.

SOMERS 11/29/13 Allen Deronsle, of Vernon, carries a Christmas tree he and his family cut at Hemlock Hill Christmas tree farm in Somers Friday. Deronsle has been cutting a tree at the farm for the past eight years.  CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

SOMERS 11/29/13 Allen Deronsle, of Vernon, carries a Christmas tree he and his family cut at Hemlock Hill Christmas tree farm in Somers Friday. Deronsle has been cutting a tree at the farm for the past eight years. CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

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Idyllic I-Park

I-Park is an artist’s retreat nestled on 450 wooded acres in East Haddam where artists can go for four-week residencies to create in peaceful seclusion.  Six artists are chosen by jury for each residency, including writers, visual artists, musicians, sculptors, architects and landscape designers.  Artists live in the park’s main house and work in assigned studio spaces.  A lovely path takes visitors around a large pond where they can see various ephemeral installations left behind by artists from I-Park’s Environmental Art Biennale, a three-week program that takes place every two years for artists to create site-specific pieces.  I-Park, a non-profit foundation, will hold an open house on Sunday, November 24, where visitors can meet the current artists in residence and tour the idyllic grounds. To learn more about the artist’s enclave, read Susan Dunne’s story here.

EAST HADDAM 10/30/13 An ephemeral art installation called "Clytia" by Tatiana Ferahian, an artist from Cyprus, made with sunglass lenses strung together in the pattern of a sunflower seed head, is suspended between two trees at I-Park.  CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

EAST HADDAM 10/30/13 An ephemeral art installation called “Clytia” by Tatiana Ferahian, an artist from Cyprus, made with sunglass lenses strung together in the pattern of a sunflower seed head, is suspended between two trees at I-Park. CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

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Destiny Africa Children’s Choir

Destiny Africa Children’s Choir gave a sneak peek of their upbeat show in two short performances at Nayaug Elementary School in Glastonbury Tuesday, previewing what to expect when the choir, from the Kampala Children’s Centre in Uganda, performs a free 90 minute concert at Glastonbury High School on Friday, December 6 at 6:30. The choir combines singing, dancing and African drumming as they perform for audiences around the globe, raising money for the center. For more on the choir, and how they came to visit Connecticut, see Peter Marteka’s story here.

 

GLASTONBURY 11/12/13 Destiny Africa Children's Choir performed at Nayaug Elementary School in Glastonbury Tuesday to promote a free concert they are giving at Glastonbury High School on December 6. CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

GLASTONBURY 11/12/13 Destiny Africa Children’s Choir performed at Nayaug Elementary School in Glastonbury Tuesday to promote a free concert they are giving at Glastonbury High School on December 6. CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

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A Soldier’s Surprise

Marine Lance Cpl. Dan Coppinger-Donovan surprised his siblings, Mary Barden, 11, a sixth-grader, and Charles Barden, 9, a fourth-grader, at the Ann Antolini Elementary School’s 13th annual Veteran’s Day celebration Friday morning. Coppinger-Donovan had been serving in the Persian Gulf and the Mediterranean for several months and hadn’t seen his family since leaving home on January 1 of this year. He left Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, North Carolina on Thursday on a four-day leave, and drove fourteen hours to New Hartford, arriving at 6:00 a.m. Friday morning to attend the ceremony and surprise his younger siblings. He emerged unannounced from backstage during the event in the school’s auditorium as his siblings were being questioned about their brother by fourth-grade teacher Sheila Hawley. After an emotional reunion, the event proceeded as usual with songs and poetry, and a slide show of students relatives who are veterans. When the event ended, Coppinger-Donovan carried his siblings – over his shoulders – back to their classrooms. There would be plenty of time to visit at home for a perfect Veteran’s Day weekend.

NEW HARTFORD 11/08/13 Marine Lance Cpl.  Dan Coppinger-Donovan surprised his siblings, Mary Barden, 11, and Charles Barden, 9, at Ann Antolini Elementary School's annual Veteran's Day celebration after being deployed in the Persian Gulf for the past several months.  Coppinger-Donovan is based at Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, North Carolina, is home in New Hartford on a four-day Veteran's Day leave. Coppinger-Donovan's older sister, Cara Coppinger-Donovan is at left.  CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

NEW HARTFORD 11/08/13 Marine Lance Cpl. Dan Coppinger-Donovan surprised his siblings, Mary Barden, 11, and Charles Barden, 9, at Ann Antolini Elementary School’s annual Veteran’s Day celebration after being deployed in the Persian Gulf for the past several months. Coppinger-Donovan is based at Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, North Carolina, is home in New Hartford on a four-day Veteran’s Day leave. Coppinger-Donovan’s older sister, Cara Coppinger-Donovan is at left. CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

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Tune-Up For The New Season

The defending national champion UConn women’s basketball team dispatched  Philadelphia University with a lopsided score of 93-28 in a fast-paced exhibition game at the XL Center Tuesday night.  It was the second of two pre-season games in which UConn easily rolled over lesser opponents before the new season gets underway on Saturday when they meet Jen Rizotti’s Hartford Hawks.  No. 3 Stanford rolls into town on Monday.  Read John Altavilla’s game story here.

HARTFORD 11/05/13 UConn's Stefanie Dolson (31) is fouled by Philadelphia's Monica Schacker (23) in the first half in an exhibition game at the XL Center in Hartford Tuesday night.  CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

HARTFORD 11/05/13 UConn’s Stefanie Dolson (31) is fouled by Philadelphia’s Monica Schacker (23) in the first half in an exhibition game at the XL Center in Hartford Tuesday night. CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

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Ohhhhh and 7

Bright sun and warm temperatures notwithstanding, the Huskies performance at UCF in Orlando on Saturday was anything but warm and sunny.  More like a pre-Halloween scare fest.  They suffered another blowout as the UCF Knights skewered them, 62-17 at Bright House Networks Stadium.  For the gory details, see Dez Conner’s account here. With five games remaining in the season the question remains: can they right the ship?

ORLANDO 10/26/13 UConn running back Lyle McCombs (43) looks grim as he leaves the field after UConn took a drubbing by UCF at Bright House Networks Stadium, losing 62-17 Saturday. CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

ORLANDO 10/26/13 UConn running back Lyle McCombs (43) looks grim as he leaves the field after UConn took a drubbing by UCF at Bright House Networks Stadium, losing 62-17 Saturday. CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

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UConn’s First Night

UConn previewed the 2013-14 basketball season with their annual First Night celebration before a packed house at Gampel Pavilion Friday night. The event included the usual autograph signing, player introductions – with several showing off their dance moves – and a few trivia games for the players and contests for the fans. Then, for the first time, the two teams merged for an inter-squad scrimmage pitting Team Geno, in white, against Team Kevin in blue. Team Geno came from behind to win it, 51-49. To read Jeff Jacob’s column and see more coverage of the event, click here.

STORRS 10/18/13 Members of Team Geno seek crowd support during a trivia game at UConn's First Night festivities.  They are Phil Nolan, Omar Calhoun, Breanna Stewart, Shabazz Napier, Bria Hartley (back to camera), Tor Watts and Niels Giffey (l-r.)  CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

STORRS 10/18/13 Members of Team Geno seek crowd support during a trivia game at UConn’s First Night festivities. They are Phil Nolan, Omar Calhoun, Breanna Stewart, Shabazz Napier, Bria Hartley (back to camera), Tor Watts and Niels Giffey (l-r.) CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

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Fortune Comes Home

Finally, after 215 years, a slave named Fortune was laid to rest in Waterbury Thursday. What was billed as a “Coming Home Service for Mr. Fortune” drew hundreds of mourners for a funeral ceremony at St. John’s Episcopal Church conducted by Rev. Amy D. Welin.  A burial service followed at Riverside Cemetery under a steady rain and rumbling thunder. Fortune died in a drowning accident in 1798, and his bones had been used for years for anatomical studies, first by his owner, Dr. Preserved Porter in the late 18th century. In 1933, Fortune’s bones were donated by a descendent of Dr. Porter to the Mattatuck Museum where his skeleton, called “Larry,” was on exhibit for nearly 30 years.  In the 1970s the skeleton was removed from display and in the 1990s, the museum’s African American History Project Committee worked with anthropologists from the New York Burial Ground Project to discover Fortune’s story.  Now the museum has unveiled a permanent exhibit of Fortune’s story and the history of slavery in Waterbury.  And Fortune has at last come home to rest. To learn more, click here for a story by Susan Dunne and Daniela Altimari.

WATERBURY 09/12/13 A mourner places a bouquet of flowers on a casket holding the remains of Fortune, a slave who died in Waterbury in 1798. A funeral service was held at St. John's Episcopal Church followed by a bural at Riverside Cemetery in Waterbury Thursday. CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

WATERBURY 09/12/13 A mourner places a bouquet of flowers on a casket holding the remains of Fortune, a slave who died in Waterbury in 1798. A funeral service was held at St. John’s Episcopal Church followed by a bural at Riverside Cemetery in Waterbury Thursday. CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

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First Day of School in New Britain

Schools opened in New Britain Tuesday welcoming students, many of whom were getting used to new surroundings.  In a push to reestablish “neighborhood schools,” the city underwent redistricting that reassigned many students.  Here are some scenes from the first day at Vance Village Elementary School, a K-5 school with a student body of about 500 children.

NEW BRITAIN 09/03/13 - Vance Village Elementary School principal Sarah Harris high fives a 2nd-grade student just before the start of the first day of school in New Britain.  Vance Village is a K-5 school with a student body of about 500. CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

NEW BRITAIN 09/03/13 – Vance Village Elementary School principal Sarah Harris high fives a 2nd-grade student before the start of the first day of school in New Britain.  CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

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East Haven: View From Above

On Monday I was assigned to take a flight from Brainard Airport in Hartford to East Haven to take aerial photographs of the site where a plane crashed into two houses on Charter Oak Avenue Friday killing two occupants of one house and the pilot and his son aboard the plane.  The plane had been attempting to land at Tweed-New Haven Airport just a few blocks from the site. The wreckage from the plane had been removed over the weekend, but the houses still stood, scarred and empty as they await demolition sometime this week.  A makeshift memorial of candles and stuffed animals is visible along a chain link fence at lower left and a shrine to the Virgin Mary is visible in the corner of the backyard of one of the houses, shaded by trees that were scorched by the intense fire that engulfed the crash.  For the latest updates on the crash, read more in a story and see video here.

2013.08.12 - East Haven, CT - This aerial view of the site on Charter Oak Avenue in East Haven show where a plane crashed into two houses, killing four people on Friday.  The debris of the plane has been removed.

2013.08.12 – East Haven, CT – This aerial view of the site on Charter Oak Avenue in East Haven show where a plane crashed into two houses, killing four people on Friday. The debris of the plane has been removed.

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Beatrice Fox Auerbach Exhibit

The Mandell Jewish Community Center in West Hartford has mounted an exhibit, “Beatrice Fox Auerbach: The Woman, Her World and Her Wardrobe.”  The exhibit includes historical photographs of Fox Auerbach as well as several articles of clothing and accessories that she once owned.  The exhibit will be on display until September 27.

Several outfits once worn by Beatrice Fox Auerbach are on display at the exhibit.

Several outfits once worn by Beatrice Fox Auerbach are on display at the exhibit.

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A-Mazing Sunflowers

The Lyman Orchards Sunflower Maze in Middlefield opened for the season on Saturday. The maze, cut in the shape of a roller coaster, meanders through three acres of about 350,000 spectacular red and yellow sunflowers and is open daily until August 25. $1 of each admission is donated to the Connecticut Children’s Medical Center.

Rachel Harrington, 11, of Cheshire, feels the petals of a sunflower while visiting the Sunflower Maze at Lyman Orchards.

Rachel Harrington, 11, of Cheshire, feels the petals of a sunflower while visiting the Sunflower Maze at Lyman Orchards.

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Big City Circus

The Big City Circus – 25th Children’s Circus of Middletown will wow the audience Friday evening, August 2, with stilt walkers, acrobats, clowns, jugglers and an array of skits and performances – including a 12-foot Godzilla puppet – when they give their only performance at 5 p.m. at Macdonough School in Middletown.  The performance will be the culmination of a five-week program run by the Oddfellows Playhouse Youth Theater and the hard work of about 130 children ages 8 to 14.  The circus usually draws a large crowd so arriving early to get a good spot is advised.

“This is one of the best things Middletown has,” said director Jason Leinwand. “Everything is ensemble-based. It required team work, communication, imagination. Kids don’t spend the summer in a video-game bubble. They have to interact.” (From story by Susan Dunne.)

Kadin Eason, 13, of Middletown, practices his juggling act during a rehearsal of the Big City Circus  at Macdonough School.  Eason is taking part in the program for the first time this summer and loves the team-building aspect of the circus.  "It's awesome!" he said.

2013.07.30 – Middletown, CT – Kadin Eason, 13, of Middletown, practices his juggling act during a rehearsal of the Big City Circus at Macdonough School. Eason is taking part in the program for the first time this summer and loves the team-building aspect of the circus. “It’s awesome!” he said.

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Summer Idyll

Each summer since 1951 children from the greater New Haven area have been loaded into a bus and whisked 30 miles north to a wooded hide-away in Durham called Camp Farnam.  The camp is run by Farnam Neighborhood House in the Fair Haven section of New Haven, a neighborhood center that provides a variety of programs for the children in the community. The camp, accessed by a long gravel road, is tucked away on 72 idyllic acres that is surrounded by many more acres of state forest. Its a place where kids can experience the outdoors in a safe environment with a range of activities including swimming instruction, nature studies, sports, nutrition education, arts and crafts and music, dance and much more.  Friendships are formed and memories are made with help from devoted counselors, many of whom were once campers themselves.  On a recent day, during the final week of the six-week program, campers were taking part in the Farnam Olympics, with fast-paced activities to promote team building, unity and, of course, lots of fun.

2013/07/30 Durham - Lizbeth Velez, 8, of New Haven, (right) glances up at camp counselor Melissa Mathews (off camera) to see if she has won a "pie" eating contest during the Farnam Olympics at Camp Farnam in Durham Tuesday morning. Her opponent, Alexis Hernandez, 12, (left) of Hamden, was ultimately declared the winner.  The "pie" consisted of a mound of Marshmallow Fluff, jelly and sprinkles.

2013/07/30 Durham – Lizbeth Velez, 8, of New Haven, (right) glances up at camp counselor Melissa Mathews (off camera) to see if she has won a “pie” eating contest during the Farnam Olympics at Camp Farnam in Durham Tuesday morning. Her opponent, Alexis Hernandez, 12, (left) of Hamden, was ultimately declared the winner. The “pie” consisted of a mound of Marshmallow Fluff, jelly and sprinkles.

 

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Scantic River Linear Trail

The Scantic River Linear Trail is a quiet gem hiding just south of busy Rt. 190 in the Hazardville section of Enfield.  The trail leads hikers along wooded pathways to the clear water of the Scantic River.  Wooden benches provide restful spots to stop and take in the sound of songbirds in the canopy and perhaps a glimpse of a great blue heron fishing in the river.  To read about the trail, see Peter Marteka’s column.

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Spreading the Word

2013.06.24 - Tolland, CT - Jim Sumner, of Tolland, plays the hymn "How Great Thou Art" on the trombone while standing next to a shelter at a commuter parking lot off I-84 in Tolland. A retired auto-body repairman, Sumner said he was reborn about 35 years ago and feels compelled to evangelize.  He plays one of three horns he brings to the parking lot about once or twice a week when "the spirit moves me," he said. He taped up a drawing he did of three crosses inside the shelter window.  He plays to encourage people in faith and to reach out to people that don't have any, he explained.  "The lonely and the broken-hearted people are my biggest concern," he said.  CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

2013.06.24 – Tolland, CT – Jim Sumner, of Tolland, plays the hymn “How Great Thou Art” on the trombone while standing next to a shelter at a commuter parking lot off I-84 in Tolland. A retired auto-body repairman, Sumner said he was reborn about 35 years ago and feels compelled to evangelize to spread God’s word.  He plays in the commuter lot about once or twice a week when “the spirit moves me,” he said. He taped up a drawing he did of three crosses inside the shelter window. He picked this spot because a lot of cars come off the highway to grab a coffee at the nearby Dunkin’ Donuts or a bite to eat at Subway across the street.  People often stop to talk when they hear him playing. He plays to encourage people in faith and to reach out to people that don’t have any, he explained. “The lonely and the broken-hearted people are my biggest concern,” he said. CLOE POISSON|cpoisson@courant.com

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Take Your Dog To Work Day

The employee handbook at Keiler advertising agency in Farmington includes a Puppy Policy allowing employees to bring their dogs to work.  But Friday was designated Take Your Dog (or dogs) To Work Day that included an owner/dog look-alike contest and a cookout at which the dogs (and humans) were served ice cream treats.  The day was the culmination of a month-long effort by employees to collect supplies and raise awareness for New Britain Shelter Friends, an all-volunteer non-profit that advocates for the well-being of dogs in the New Britain Animal Control facility.