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Hungry Huskies Win Fourth Championship

After the game, UConn senior guard, Shabazz Napier, explained to the crowd at AT&T Stadium in Dallas Texas how UConn defeated the odds, and some of the country’s highest ranked teams, to win their fourth national title. They were hungry. They were the “Hungry Huskies.” UConn left it all on the floor as they beat an extremely talented Kentucky team by a score of 60 to 53.

Click here to read Dom Amore game story and click here to read his story about how this championship will be a goldmine for recruiting, and a new contract for the coach. Click here to read Jeff Jacobs column on how the Huskies won the championship by climbing one step at a time.

UConn Huskies guard Shabazz Napier, 13, reacts after the game.

UConn Huskies guard Shabazz Napier, 13, reacts after the game.

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UConn Men Advance To NCAA Championship Game

The game ended much differently than it started. Midway through the first period, UConn was down by twelve points, 16 to 4. But after a called timeout UConn roared back to score 11 unanswered points, which saw DeAndrea Daniels hit the three-point- shots. When UConn ended the first half with a three point lead, the tide had turned, and the Huskies had the waves at their back the rest of the way. UConn defeated the Florida Gators Saturday night to advance the the NCAA Division I Championship game against Kentucky Monday.

Click here to read Dom Amore’s game story. Click here to read Paul Doyle’s story on Shabazz Napier, the kid from Roxbury. Click here to read Jeff Jacobs’ column about UConn being one game away from redemption. Click here for Dom Amore story on UConn brimming with confidence.

DeAndre Daniels signals #1 after scoring a 3-pointer in the 2nd half as UConn pulled ahead.

DeAndre Daniels signals #1 after scoring a 3-pointer in the 2nd half as UConn pulled ahead.

 

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POTUS Photos

06.27.2008 - Unity, NH - Barack Obama worked the crowd and still had time to smile for the cameras following his appearance in Unity, N.H. Friday afternoon with Hillary Clinton. Photograph by Stephen Dunn | sdunn@courant.com

06.27.2008 – Unity, NH – Barack Obama worked the crowd and still had time to smile for the cameras following his appearance in Unity, N.H. Friday afternoon with Hillary Clinton. Photograph by Stephen Dunn | sdunn@courant.com

Photographers show up hours before POTUS is to arrive. We must pass security. That takes time. We get wanded by magnetometers and inspected by bomb sniffing dogs. We are ushered, guided, and ordered by secret service and handlers. And then we wait.

On some Connecticut visits Courant photographers are designated “pool photographers” granting them better access to the president on the condition that we share whatever we photograph with other media. We join the traveling press corps and ride in the official motorcade. The status grants us closer and more fluid movement around the president. Somewhat closer that our colleagues standing in the back of the room.

Presidents arrive in a flash of activity like a midsummer thunderstorm . The police, secret service, politicians and the traveling press arrive at once. Then POTUS arrives. And as quickly as he arrives, he leaves. The police, secret service and traveling press leave too.

My first experience photographing President Jimmy Carter was not a success.

12.10.1978 - Hartford, Ct - President Jimmy Carter waves among a gaggle of politicians outside the Hartford Hilton. MICHAEL McANDREWS | mmcandrews@courant.com

12.10.1978 – Hartford, Ct – President Jimmy Carter waves among a gaggle of politicians outside the Hartford Hilton. MICHAEL McANDREWS | mmcandrews@courant.com

 

I knew President Jimmy Carter liked to press the flesh. He would wander up to shake, squeeze, wave, touch and smile his way down along line of fans pressed against the barricades, eager to be close to the most powerful man in the country. I’ve seen it. I wanted to photograph that ritual up close when he came to Hartford December 10th, 1978.

I planted myself at the fence hours before he was to arrive. The crowds grew. So did the excitement. Soon people were standing 4 deep behind me.

We all waited together.

He got out of his limo surrounded by politicians and Secret service and raised his right hand in a wistful way to acknowledge the crowd. Then he was gone, ushered into the Hartford Hilton in one swift smooth motion. The idea for the picture didn’t work this time.

I got a picture of his arm and the back of his hand. That was my first attempt at photographing a visiting president.

19.16.1980 - Hartford, CT - President Jimmy Carter, from the roof of his limo, waves to fans outside the Old State House in Hartford. MICHAEL McANDREWS | The Hartford Courant

19.16.1980 – Hartford, CT – President Jimmy Carter, from the roof of his limo, waves to fans outside the Old State House in Hartford. MICHAEL McANDREWS | The Hartford Courant

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77th Manchester Road Race

A beautiful, yet cold, Thanksgiving morning saw the successful running of the 77th Manchester Road Race. As is tradition, skilled and dedicated runners from around the country and world, were joined by local runners and walkers who ran the race in funny costumes.

The crowd at the start of the 2013 Manchester Road Race. (MRR Photo by John Long)

The crowd at the start of the 2013 Manchester Road Race. (MRR Photo by John Long)

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Huskies Overpowered by Towson

The UConn Huskies football team suffered a disappointing loss to a 1-AA team for the first time since 2001 when they played Eastern Washington. Their next game is Saturday September 14th at Rentschler Field against the Maryland Terrapins.

Connecticut running back Lyle McCombs carries the ball in the second quarter against Towson at Rentschler Field in East Hartford, Connecticut, on Thursday, August 29, 2013. Towson won, 33-18. STEPHEN DUNN/sdunn@courant.com

Connecticut running back Lyle McCombs carries the ball in the second quarter against Towson at Rentschler Field in East Hartford, Connecticut, on Thursday, August 29, 2013. Towson won, 33-18. STEPHEN DUNN/sdunn@courant.com

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Competitive Cribbage

Karl Russo of East Glastonbury, left, and Phil Martin of Newington, right, share a laugh over a hand of cribbage during the weekly meeting of the Hartford Metro Cribbage Club. More than 30 members meet on Monday nights at the Moose Lodge for some competitive games. "This is the best two-handed game ever invented," said Martin.

Karl Russo of East Glastonbury, left, and Phil Martin of Newington, right, share a laugh over a hand of cribbage during the weekly meeting of the Hartford Metro Cribbage Club. More than 30 members meet on Monday nights at the Moose Lodge for some competitive games. “This is the best two-handed game ever invented,” said Martin.

Check out the photo page on the East Hartford-based Cribbage club on page B6 of the CTSunday section of today’s Courant. A great group of people who have a ball on Monday nights playing the game they love.

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Hot, Hot, HOT!

 With temperatures in the mid-90's and the air thick with humidity, Ron Ragion of Enfield, a Ct. Natural Gas Chief distribution fitter, wipes away the sweat as he finishes up installing a new plastic main line tie-in along Porter St. in Manchester Tuesday afternoon. "This heat tears me up, " he said as he climbed out of the trench where he was working. STEPHEN DUNN|sdunn@courant.com

With temperatures in the mid-90′s and the air thick with humidity, Ron Ragion of Enfield, a Ct. Natural Gas Chief distribution fitter, wipes away the sweat as he finishes up installing a new plastic main line tie-in along Porter St. in Manchester Tuesday afternoon. “This heat tears me up, ” he said as he climbed out of the trench where he was working. STEPHEN DUNN|sdunn@courant.com

2-HOT-HOT-WKRYou think you’re hot? Try working in a pit surrounded by tar and steel plates. These CNG workers had to call it a day mid-afternoon when the temperature in the trench approached 100 degrees.

Archive

And Yet More Rain

EAST HARTFORD- 6/13/13- Jason Robacznski of East Hartford decided to check ou tthe flooding at Great River Park on the banks of th eConn. River Thursday with is dog, Sid. There is a flood watch in effect for the entire region until early Saturday. The heavy rains have led to flood warnings is in Hartford, Middlesex, Fairfield and New Haven counties.

EAST HARTFORD- 6/13/13- Jason Robacznski of East Hartford decided to check ou tthe flooding at Great River Park on the banks of th eConn. River Thursday with is dog, Sid. There is a flood watch in effect for the entire region until early Saturday. The heavy rains have led to flood warnings is in Hartford, Middlesex, Fairfield and New Haven counties.

Remember the drought of May? The rains of June have washed away that memory. The heavy downpours throughout the region have created flooding along the state rivers. Raincoats, sweaters and boots are the order of the day today but this weekend is expected to be gorgeous. Fingers crossed.

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SWOLLEN BROOK

MIDDLETOWN 6/11/13- The rain-swollen Laurel Grove Brook roars along near the old brownstone bridge that is part of the Wadsworth estate. The bridge is along the old carriage road that Col. Wadsworth took through the former 500-acre estate. It was built by the Civilian Conservation Corps during Great Depression and made of local brownstone.

MIDDLETOWN 6/11/13- The rain-swollen Laurel Grove Brook roars along near the old brownstone bridge that is part of the Wadsworth estate. The bridge is along the old carriage road that Col. Wadsworth took through the former 500-acre estate. It was built by the Civilian Conservation Corps during Great Depression and made of local brownstone.

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Archive

THEY LOVE THEIR MAYOR

 Supporters of Mayor Donald Trinks held a rally for him before the Democratic Town Committee meeting Thursday night. Trinks, the town council's top vote getter in the last six elections was surprisingly not endorsed for a seventh term on the council last week.

Supporters of Mayor Donald Trinks held a rally for him before the Democratic Town Committee meeting Thursday night. Trinks, the town council’s top vote getter in the last six elections was surprisingly not endorsed for a seventh term on the council last week.

 Supporters of Mayor Donald Trinks held a rally for him before the Democratic Town Committee meeting Thursday night. Trinks, the town council's top vote getter in the last six elections was surprisingly not endorsed for a seventh term on the council last week.

Supporters of Mayor Donald Trinks held a rally for him before the Democratic Town Committee meeting Thursday night. Trinks, the town council’s top vote getter in the last six elections was surprisingly not endorsed for a seventh term on the council last week.

 Supporters of Mayor Donald Trinks held a rally for him before the Democratic Town Committee meeting Thursday night. Trinks, the town council's top vote getter in the last six elections was surprisingly not endorsed for a seventh term on the council last week.

Supporters of Mayor Donald Trinks held a rally for him before the Democratic Town Committee meeting Thursday night. Trinks, the town council’s top vote getter in the last six elections was surprisingly not endorsed for a seventh term on the council last week.

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Archive

ESL CLASS

The Hartford Public Library recieved the LibraryAware Community Award  Wednesday which recognized the entire Hartford community for it's Library’s engagement with its city. This  is a national award being given to only three libraries in the nation. Members of the Library community including an ESL class of recent immigrants, atttended the  ceremony at The Old State House.   Mayor Pedro Segarra and Library Chief Executive Officer Matthew K. Poland, accepted the large bronze plaque and $5000 award. In photo, Nailah Prvem of Pakistan, center, sits with her Hartford Public Library-based ESL class watching the ceremony.

The Hartford Public Library recieved the LibraryAware Community Award Wednesday which recognized the entire Hartford community for it’s Library’s engagement with its city. This is a national award being given to only three libraries in the nation. Members of the Library community including an ESL class of recent immigrants, atttended the ceremony at The Old State House. Mayor Pedro Segarra and Library Chief Executive Officer Matthew K. Poland, accepted the large bronze plaque and $5000 award. In photo, Nailah Prvem of Pakistan, center, sits with her Hartford Public Library-based ESL class watching the ceremony.

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WHEN DIRT TURNS TO DUST

DUSTY-DIRT Lloyd Allen, a farmworker for Johnny Appleseed’s Farm in Ellington, raises dust as he plows a field on Pinney Road in preparation for planting corn in the next few weeks. The lack of rain has made the dirt appear to be a pile of dust. Will it ever rain? The weather folks say tomorrow.

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MAKING RAIN

1-MAKING-RAIN With no rain for the past month in Old Lyme, Linda Kelly, the owner of Old Lyme Landscape, creates her own as she waters some of the several thousand geraniums in their greenhouses in preparation for the upcoming Mother’s Day and Memorial Day holidays. Kelly says Mother’s Day is the biggest holiday for selling hanging baskets. “You don’t have to wrap it and it has a handle,” she said.

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CHANNELING DIANE ARBUS

1-SENIORS-PROM Peggy Mottola of Cromwell donned her pink dress and tiara and headed to the dance floor.

 

      Gathering my equipment from the back of my car in the New Britain High School parking lot recently, I could hear the strains of good old-fashioned rock n’ roll emanating from the cafeteria. As I made my way in, an elderly woman, dressed for a dance, was heading the wrong way. “It’s too loud. I can’t stay in there,” she said and walked toward her car in a huff. Not sure what to expect, I walked through the doors. It was like stepping back in time. The band was rocking out, playing doo-wop from the 50′s and 60′s. Some men wore tuxedos, others wore jackets and ties. The women wore dresses and some wore poodle skirts, Bobby socks and white Keds. On closer inspection, the scene looked like something from a Diane Arbus photo project. These folks may have been senior citizens but they were acting like high school seniors. And they were having a ball. So I got to work documenting the scene and when I was done, I had a lot of new friends.

More than 320 senior citizens attended the 15th Annual “Senior Prom” in the New Britain High School cafeteria that Thursday night. The  annual Intergenerational Senior Prom was sponsored by New Britain TRIAD, a city partnership between law enforcement, support services and seniors.  The theme was “rock ‘n roll” and the seniors danced the night away to the music of The Sharades.

2-SENIORS-PROM Poodle skirts were in abundance on the dance floor, from left, Ann Robida, and Dottie Dabkowski, both of New Britain.

3-SENIORS-PROM Judy Bosco of Kensington, right, wearing her blue Poodle skirt, gets down low while dancing to Chubby Checker’s, The Twist. Her dance partner is Frank Zajko of New Britain.

8-SENIORS-PROM Sue Scherff and Gene Drezek, both of New Britain, show off their dance moves on the dance floor. the two friends have been dance partners for 16 years.

6-SENIORS-PROM Peggy Mottola of Cromwell donned her pink dress and tiara and rocked out on the dance floor.

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GUARD ART

The New Britain Museum of American Art may be on to something. The security guard that is on duty at the front entrance to the galleries works 24/7, requires no sleep, no food and no pay. The guard, of course, is actually a work of art, a hyper-realistic sculpture by artist Marc Sijan.  Museum patrons do double-takes all day long as they enter the glass doors to the galleries under the watchful eye of the “Security Guard.” The sculpture is so realistic that many are inclined to reach out and touch it but they are strongly, and loudly, advised against doing that by the staff manning the front desk.   The polyresin sculpture, from 2006, uses layers of acrylics, acids and oil paints to create the life-like look.
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Don Coughlin of Bethel does a double-take as he enters the New Britain Museum of American Art as he passes a very life-like security guard which is actually a work of art and on display in the museum’s entry hall. The polyresin sculpture was created by artist Marc Sijan in 2006 and is referred to as Hyper-realistic. Coughlin works at a golf course and spends his five month off-season visiting art museums every week.

2 GUARD ART
Pat McKernan of Farmington, left, and Gina Koppel of West Hartford, get a closer look at a very life-like security guard which is actually a work of art and on display in the the New Britain Museum of American Art entry hall.

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Archive

SURVIVING SANDY…ALMOST

Nancy Grant and George Vinick leap out of the way of a huge wave in front of Grant’s home in Neptune Park Monday. The water at 10 am was already breaching the seawall and both residents left their homes.

Having covered many hurricanes, blizzards and natural disasters for decades, I was ready for Sandy but I was still nervous. The hype was incredible.

“This is the largest threat to human life that our state has experienced in anyone’s lifetime,” said Gov. Malloy.

Whoa, that’s enough to make anyone nervous. While everyone in the state prepared and headed home to hunker down, the Courant photo staff headed out to their assignments along the shoreline. I was assigned to New London and got photos of the powerful storm surge by late afternoon. Once it was dark, I tried to hunker down at my hotel but then the power went off there so I headed out to try and document the storm as it happened. Not an easy task. The next morning, the devastation was huge in certain areas of the state and our photogs in Milford, Fairfield and Old Saybrook made incredible images. This was not the killer storm of our lifetime, however. Not by a long shot.

Several cottages that have stood by the water for decades were destroyed by Sandy’s massive tidal surge Monday night at Hawk’s Nest Beach.

Reese Garvin steps in between the waves to get a closer look at Hawk’s Nest.

The front of this cottage is missing leaving only the ocean to enter.

An Old Lyme firefighter checks the damage to this home on Sargent Rd. where a giant tree fell, crushing it Monday night.


The evacuation center at the Winthrop School in New London had to be evacuated at the height of the storm when the generator quit. Jan Dowling awaited a ride to the shelter in East Lyme.

John Carter, 16, of Old Lyme waited for the high winds to ebb before taking to the water for some kite-boarding Tuesday at White Sands Beach. As storm clouds re-appeared, Carter headed back to Griswold Point where he began.

Christopher Harding of Wethersfield walks around his family’s beachfront home at White Sands Beach Tuesday. Although the house is intact, more than 6′ of water traveled through the house and filled it with sand so it “almost” survived.

 

 

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(POLE) DANCING IN THE RAIN


Those who ventured out for lunch on Main St. in Hartford Friday might have been surprised to find two exotic dancers performing inside a glass-sided box truck.

Talk about a double-take. I was heading to an assignment downtown in the pouring rain when I saw two women pole dancing inside a glass-walled box truck. Say what? I just had to shoot this. It felt kind of creepy, to be honest, when I started shooting but I thought that maybe I could make a publishable weather photo out of this. But then it just got weirder and weirder when some men got kind of close to the window. It turned out that this was a first-time use of this truck as a promotional tool for an exotic dancer men’s club nearby. While the photos were a hit in the 4 o’clock news meeting, it was decided not to publish. Good decision. We don’t need to be promoting this club. It did make some pretty odd photos though.

Really?

Go Hartford. So proud.

 

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SEA OF SUNFLOWERS

Joe Klimasiewfski (cq) of Warwick, R.I., frames up some of the 500,000 sunflowers growing at Buttonwood Farms during the 9th Annual Sunflowers for Wishes event at the Griswold farm. From July 21st through 29th, thousands of people will visit the sunflower fields where bunches of the giant flowers are being sold for $5.00 each. All the money from the event is donated to the Make-A-Wish foundation, an organization that helps wishes come true for children battling life-threatening illness.

This was a can’t miss photo assignment. A half-million full grown sunflowers growing in a tightly packed field. We shoot it every year but this year I assigned it to myself. Years ago, Duane and Kim Button grew one acre of sunflowers to give their ice cream customers something to look at. They started selling the flowers for charity shortly after and the fields grew to 15 acres. Last year, the Make-a-Wish foundation received $100,000 from the event.
The key to making this photo work is to get up high to show the vast expanse of flowers. I found a hill nearby that was perfect. Then I had to wait for people to be in my photo. It did not take long. As morning turned to afternoon, the parking lot filled and streams of spectators marveled at the giant flowers as they posed for photos and ate ice cream. As I said, a can’t miss situation.

The Cow Train chugs along the path behind a tractor driven by Duane Button, the owner of the farm, around the 500,000 sunflowers growing at Buttonwood Farms during the 9th Annual Sunflowers for Wishes event at the Griswold farm.

Cameras and camera phones were kept busy as thousands came out to view the 500,000 sunflowers growing at Buttonwood Farms.

A bee is busy in this close-up of one of the giant sunflowers in the 15 acre field of sunflowers.

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GRADUATION ANGST

Arianna Thibodeau of Simsbury signals her parents in the upper level of the XL Center with an emotional thank-you at the start of the Central Connecticut State University commencement exercises Friday night. The arena was packed as the thousands of graduates waited to receive their degrees.

GRADUATION DAYS

It’s that time of year again when photojournalists throughout the country have to cover high school and college graduations. While the big day is huge for the graduates and their families, photographers cringe when they remember that they may be shooting two or three of these events per night. The problem is that they all look the same after awhile and our job is to create original, creative photographs for the next day’s paper and web galleries.

Here is a checklist for all photographers who are about to cover a graduation:

1. Park your car in an area where you can make a quick retreat.

2. Take a deep breath and try to pump yourself up thinking creative thoughts before getting out of the car. Sometimes just getting out of the car is the most difficult moment.

3. Get to the event early. This is the only time you will be able to make photographs and get names of the subjects. This is also the time to get the best photos of students getting excited and helping each other get ready.

4. Scout out the location of the ceremony and get in position to make a creative shot of the graduates marching into the venue.

5. Avoid the speeches. These are boring. (Why can’t commencement speakers get a clue and actually say something the graduates might remember?)

6. Panic. Where is the picture? It’s got to be out there somewhere. Wait. There it is. The perfect shot.

6. Time to go. Transmit your photos.

7. Arrive at the next graduation.

8. Begin again. Breathe…

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THE Q VIEW

The new Pearl Harbor Memorial Bridge, also known as the "Q" Bridge, is under construction spanning the Quinnipiac River in New Haven. At left is the Tomlinson lift bridge and at right is the existing bridge. With the lift bridge up, an oyster boat makes it's way upriver under the bridges.

The interchange for I-91 and I-95 in New Haven has been a mess for a long time. It seems like the area has been under construction for our entire lives. Making my way to the top of one of the concrete piers allowed me to get an idea of what is actually happening there. The climb inside the narrow column was difficult but the when I emerged from the top, the view was worth it. Looking at the new “Q” bridge, the old bridge and the city of New Haven from 75 feet brought the  massive project into focus. Now it makes sense. The new bridge is nearing completion and traffic should be routed onto it by this summer. Then the old bridge will be demolished in stages and another bridge matching the new one will be built in it’s place creating ultimately ten lanes of traffic in both directions. Traffic has to continue flowing during the years of construction making the construction a complex puzzle. The entire project should be completed by 2015.

Ghazi Alsaqri, a DOT Project Engineer, looks up at the massive cables holding up the new bridge while climbing inside one of the bridge columns which rises 75′ off the bridge deck. The extradosed cable stayed bridge is the first to be built in the United States. The hole at right will hold the cables for the new bridge to built alongside.

 

The new construction is the first extradosed cable stayed bridge to be built in this country and is supported by these massive cables.

 

Ghazi Alsaqri, a DOT Project Engineer, looks at the massive cables holding up the new bridge while standing atop one of the bridge columns which rises 75' off the bridge deck. The extradosed cable stayed bridge is the first to be built in the United States. At left is the Tomlinson lift bridge and at right is the existing Q Bridge.

The last gap of the new Pearl Harbor Memorial Bridge, also known as the "Q" Bridge, is about to be closed with steel and concrete as construction continues to the new span across the Quinnipiac River in New Haven and, when completed, will handle I-95 traffic which is now on the existing Q bridge at right. The new construction is the first extradosed cable stayed bridge to be built in this country and is supported by massive cables.

 

Archive

WINTER THAT WASN’T

A harbinger of spring? One year ago there was a foot of snow on the ground during one of the worst winters in history. Today, a bright red robin sits in a bud-filled tree waiting for spring. This is mid-winter?

 

One year ago, there was still a foot of snow on the ground and more on the way. It was the killer winter that would never end. January 2011 was the snowiest month ever for Connecticut, breaking the record set in 1945 with 45 inches. Last January we had already had 59.8 inches on the ground. In contrast, the snow total for Hartford so far this year is a paltry 2.” For those of us who work outdoors, this has been the best winter ever. For skiers and lovers of snow, this may be the most boring winter ever.

 

Remember this? School was cancelled once again in Tolland last winter as town crews worked with bucket loaders and shovels to clear the entrances and fire exits of the Tolland Intermediate School. Some drifts were as high as the second floor of the building completely obscuring the exit doors and windows.

 

 

The winter of 2011 was so severe that there was even snow on the beach at Rocky Neck State Park.

 

Margie Chardiet of New Haven, left, took advantage of the fresh snow at Elizabeth Park last February 22nd to take her cousin, Frances Terrien, 7, sledding.

 

PRO TIP- When I spotted the bright red robin atop the tall, budding tree, I realized that I did not have the long lenses I would need to make the shot. I dug into my camera bag of tricks and came up with a 2X extender which doubled the focal length of my zoom lens. These extenders tend to be less sharp than a good quality long lens but it was better than nothing. My tip? Never give up on a shot. Try something and hope it works.

 

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NOT SO MATURE-O

by Stephen Dunn

East Haven Mayor Joseph Maturo, Jr. met with every media outlet who asked in his office Wed. to apologize for his off-hand "Taco" remark.

Maturo has been at the center of a controversy since WPIX-TV reporter Mario Diaz asked him what he was going to do for East Haven’s Latino community in the wake of the arrest of four police officers on harassment and intimidation charges.

“I might have tacos when I go home. I’m not quite sure yet,” he said.

The media and the public jumped on his “flippant” statement and the public relations firestorm began for the mayor. Soon the arrests of four of his police officers who were arrested Tuesday after a long federal investigation, were all but forgotten. They were charged with crimes against members of the town’s Latino community ranging from beating handcuffed suspects to obstructing justice.

Mayor Joseph Maturo insisted he would not resign on Thursday, even while an immigration reform group brought 500 tacos to his office in response to his comment.

When I met the mayor in his office Wednesday, he seemed like a very nice guy who likes to tell jokes and kid around. I think from now on, he may have to pre-edit what comes out of his mouth.

 This is the photo that told the story on the front page on Thursday.

PRO TIP: Keep your head down and do your job. The mayor invited us into his office to read a statement of apology. He planned on standing behind his lecturn and reading his notes. This, of course, is boring for photos. My job is to subtley photograph the mayor anywhere but the lecturn and hope to capture a “real” moment, not a rehearsed one.