Huskies Losing A Key Player: Academic Couselor Felicia Crump Moves On

by Categorized: APR, Enosch Wolf, Jim Calhoun, Kevin Ollie, NCAA, Niels Giffey, UConn men's basketball
Date:

Felicia Crump had spent a long day in her office at Gampel Pavilion packing her stuff. But it took even longer;  Niels Giffey and Enosch Wolf came in and started unpacking it.

But there was to be no reversing things. Crump, 32, the Huskies’ academic counselor for three-plus years, was moving on. She finished at UConn on Jan. 11, and will start a new job in New York City, home for  her, in three weeks with Coach Across America, a non-profit organization that helps train and support coaches for youth programs in under-resourced communities.

“It was a hard decision to leave,” Crump said. “I cried a lot. … I never would have left if I didn’t feel things were going in the right direction, I’m too connected to them.”

Crump was a graduate assistant for three years under Ted Taigen, then began the men’s basketball team’s chief advisor in 2009, with the program in the midst of the academic troubles that led to its postseason ineligibility for this season. During her time, several Huskies players moved ahead of their classes in credits, taking summer and intercession courses. Grades went up, and the program’s APR rose 150 points to reach 978 for the 2010-11 academic year, the year of the national championship, and is expected to be about the same for 2011-12. All reports were good for this past fall semester, too. UConn will be eligible again next year, and is in solid position to remain so.

“It’s the biggest misconception people have, that the players don’t care about academics,” Crump says, “and the players feel that, too. They just have to figure out how to handle all of it. People don’t realize the demands that are on them, and once they figure out how to manage it, it really all falls into place.”

Crump, who traveled with the team and monitored study halls and school assignments the players took with them on trips, helped the players learn how to manage their time, and it was clear to those around the program that she had their attention and respect.  Jim Calhoun and Kevin Ollie always spoke very highly of her.

“It was the most challenging job,” Crump says, “but also the most rewarding and fulfilling job.  I loved it. I felt privileged and honored to be on this journey with the team, and to be able to help them become better version so of themselves.”

Before taking the job at UConn, Crump worked with Major League Baseball’s RBI (reviving baseball in the inner-city) program, so her new job fits in with her experience and passion.

At UConn, Ellen Tripp,  interim director of the Counseling Program for Intercollegiate Athletics, will take over the academic counseling for the men’s basketball program for the rest of the spring semester. After that, the decision will be made on a permanent counselor.

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11 thoughts on “Huskies Losing A Key Player: Academic Couselor Felicia Crump Moves On

  1. Hip Hop Hood

    Good riddance. Her crappy efforts put us on probation. Don’t let the door hit you on the way out…

    1. BearJWS

      Hip Hop Hood: – Try reading again! I’ll repost just for you.

      During her time, several Huskies players moved ahead of their classes in credits, taking summer and intercession courses. Grades went up, and the program’s APR rose 150 points to reach 978 for the 2010-11 academic year, the year of the national championship, and is expected to be about the same for 2011-12. All reports were good for this past fall semester, too.

    2. Hurl.

      Hip hop
      Yr a foooool. Read if you can
      On board 3 years, whoooooo goUod to great results in her tenure. Oops a feirignn word.

      good luck on your GED
      Ciao

  2. Jack

    Hip Hop, All you do is troll this blog. You are the definition of a LOSER. Everything you say is negative to get a response from other readers. I will respond that you are simply pathetic. I am sure you are a very miserable and lonely person. I am sorry you feel so empty inside that you spend your time trolling this blog. In this instance you bash a young woman who spent three years of her life, most likely making very little money and a lot of traveling, helping this basketball team with their academics. Again, you are pathetic. I hope you find someone in your life that shows you some form of attention that you no longer need to show how miserable and depressed of a man you truly are and will find better things to do than troll this blog. My summary is simply; GROW UP

  3. buddy

    They need to give them easy courses like North Carolina does and everything will fall in to place.

  4. Christopher C Noble

    The C.P.I.A. function was started when Coach Calhoun came here from N. Eastern. I was on the Alumni Board at that time and had an opportunity to closely observe its start when I obtained a donation of computers and software for the athletes to use.
    There was an issue then that flowed from the Academic status of the CPIA service. It was (and is?) an academic function which creates a management issue between the departments. The function is not directly managed by the coaches and/or the Athletic Director. Coordination of departments on campus is not as easy as many would believe.

  5. fishpaw31

    Hip Hop Hood Moron could benefit from the help of someone like Ms. Crump because clearly he lacks in reading comprehension skills.

  6. Peter

    I wish MS Crump all the best in her future endeavors. We sure are glad that she was part of the Husky team and obviously the guys will miss her too!

  7. Hip Hop Hood

    Good luck with the new job. It sounds like a taxpayer funded organization so there’s sure to be no accountability or expectations of performing well to keep the job.

Comments are closed.